Morning Glory

Morning GloryA true old-fashioned beauty, morning glory’s large, trumpet-shaped flowers come in a variety of wonderful soft colors.

Sunlight: Full sun
Maturity: 75-110 days from seed to flower
Height: 6 to 15 feet if grown on a trellis
Spacing: 4 to 6 inches apart in all directions

A favorite! Home flower gardeners are growing morning glory (Ipomoea) for their vibrant colors including purples, reds, pinks and blues. This vigorous vining plant is often found covering country fences where their delicate flowers greet you with the morning sun.

Perfect for covering walls, privacy screens and lattice — give these hardy annuals support and watch them grow! Dwarf varieties, with their multi-colored blossoms, are especially unique! Self-seeding annual.

Site Preparation:

Choose a planting site that has full sun and moist, well-drained soil. Work organic compost or aged animal manure into the ground prior to planting to help retain moisture and prevent plants from wilting during the heat of the day (see Springtime Garden Soil Preparation).

Tired of the same old flowers? Heirloom flower seeds — the ones that Grandma used to grow — add charm to your garden while stirring memories with their abundant blossoms and arousing scents. Best of all, we ship them FREE!

How to Plant:

Morning glory is easy to grow from seed. Plant outdoors 1/2 inch deep after the last frost and keep moist while germinating. Seeds will germinate in 5-21 days. Seeds can be slightly chipped and soaked in water for 24 hours before planting for better results. Thin seedlings to 4-6 inches apart. Provide support so the young plants can climb.

If you have trouble getting morning glory started, make sure the planting site is in full sun and that the seedlings never dry out until they become established. Provide an organic bloom fertilizer two or three times during the gardening season.

Insects and Disease:

Aphids and leafminer are a couple of the garden pests found attacking morning glory. Watch closely and apply organic pesticides, if necessary.

Common plant diseases include rust and Fusarium wilt. Treat early with organic fungicides and avoid overhead watering to reduce fungal problems.

Seed Saving Instructions:

Morning glories will cross-pollinate. Gardeners should only grow one variety at a time to save pure seed or isolate varieties by 1/4 mile. Seeds are ready to harvest when the seed capsules are completely dry and brown. Read more about Saving Heirloom Flower Seeds here.

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