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68 Types of Pink Flowers (With Pictures and Plant Care Tips)

Pink flowers blooming in the garden

If you are looking for flowers with stunning hues and lively feelings, try pink flowers. Pink flowers are a great addition to floral arrangements, bouquets, and decor. The color pink oozes affection, playfulness, and cheer and is a universal color of pure love, making it great for celebratory events.

Pink flowers are a staple above any floral arrangement or garden, and while, for some is critical to have the right color balance, pink flowers can successfully meet that balance. From deep magenta to cotton can pink, pink shades evoke a sense of femininity, fun, and playfulness unique to this color spectrum side.

To help you pick the perfect arrangement of delicate blush, candy-coated coral, and peachy pink, we’ve rounded up our favorite pink (and pinkish) flowers for you. P.S. Don’t be afraid to add orange flowers to electrify or white flowers to soften your mix.

1. Pink Azalea

Blooming flowers of pink azalea with raindrops in the garden

Pink Azalea – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Rhododendron

Hardiness Zones: 6 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Flowering shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun/Partial Shade

The Pink Azalea is one of my favorite flowering shrubs to grow in a garden. Azalea come in different pink shades that symbolize femininity. These flowers grow in a shrub-like shape and are often used as privacy curtains in gardens. Azalea flowers bloom throughout spring and summer.

Its vibrant pink blossoms never fail to captivate onlookers, and I’ve learned a few tricks to keep them thriving. When planting a Pink Azalea, always make sure to choose a spot with well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. This helps maintain the right balance of moisture and light. Regular watering is crucial, but be careful not to overdo it to avoid root rot.

After flowering, I recommend trimming the shrub to maintain its shape and encourage new growth. Adding a layer of mulch around the base helps keep the soil moist and suppresses weed growth. With these care tips, you’ll enjoy a splendid Pink Azalea display year after year.

2. Pink Begonia

Focus shot of pink Begonia flowers

Pink begonia – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Begonia

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun/Partial Shade

As a master gardener, I can’t resist the beauty of Pink Begonias. Their delicate pink blooms and lush foliage create an enchanting atmosphere. Begonias come in over 1,500 unique species under three categories, semperflorens, tuberous, and perennials. These edible blooms symbolize being cautious, and they resemble roses.

When growing Pink Begonias, I find that they thrive in moderate temperatures and full sun to partial shade. Always make sure they have well-draining soil and water them regularly, allowing the soil to slightly dry between waterings.

Deadheading spent flowers is essential to keep them blooming continuously, and a balanced fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season provides the necessary nutrients.

Keep an eye out for pests like aphids or snails, as they can be troublesome, but with proper care and attention, your Pink Begonias will flourish and bring elegance to your garden.

3. Butterfly Bush Pink Delight

Selective focus of the pink flowers of Butterfly Bush Pink Delight

Butterfly Bush Pink Delight (Buddleja davidii ‘Pink Delight’) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Buddleja davidii’ Pink Delight’

Hardiness Zones: 6 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Deciduous shrubs

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

The Butterfly Bush Pink Delight is a true gem in any garden. This voluptuous flower has a unique ability to attract butterflies; hence that’s how it received its name. This lovely bloom is easy to grow and take care of. Although lavender and purple hues are the most common, pink butterfly bush is just as stunning.

Over the years, I’ve observed these lovely shrubs attract countless butterflies with their fragrant pink flowers. For optimal growth, I suggest planting them in well-draining soil enriched with organic matter and placing them in a sunny location.

Watering regularly, especially during hot and dry spells, is a must. Pruning is a critical task in early spring, as it promotes vigorous flowering.

With proper care, your Butterfly Bush Pink Delight will become a delightful focal point, attracting both you and beautiful butterflies.

4. Calla Lily

Focus shot of pink calla lily flowers in the garden

calla lily – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Zantedeschia

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial bulbs

Sun Exposure: Full Sun/Partial Sun

Having cultivated Calla Lilies for years, I’ve come to appreciate their elegance and beauty. Despite their name, these perennial plants are not actual lilies. Calla lily is a genus of 28 species that are native to Africa. These flowers usually grow 1-3 feet tall and can be easily spotted by their unique signature bloom.

When it comes to these pink floral wonders, proper care is paramount. Plant them in well-draining soil and provide partial shade to full sun exposure. Consistent moisture is crucial, so make sure the soil remains evenly moist but not waterlogged.

Deadheading spent flowers and removing any yellow or withered leaves keeps the plants looking their best. In colder climates, I mulch around the base to protect the Calla Lilies from extreme cold temperatures.

With the right care and attention, your Calla Lilies will reward you with exquisite pink blooms and an aura of sophistication.

5. Carnation

Blooming pink flowers of Carnation

Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: herbaceous plant

Sun Exposure: Partial Sun

Carnations are the epitome of timeless beauty and fragrance. As a seasoned gardener, I’ve grown my fair share of these pink flowers, and they never fail to impress.

Pink and pinkish shades are the carnation’s natural colors, but with genetic engineering and selective breeding, carnations can be purple, orange, white, green, red, or blue. Carnations are edible and are often used as garnishes.

To ensure their success, I recommend planting carnations in well-draining soil with full sun to partial shade exposure. Regular watering is a must, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings. Fertilizing every two to three weeks with a balanced flower fertilizer supports healthy growth and abundant blooming.

Deadheading spent flowers not only keeps the plant tidy but also encourages continuous flowering. To preserve the delicate blooms, I protect my Carnations from strong winds and heavy rain.

With proper care and attention, your Carnations will add a lovely splash of pink to your garden, exuding elegance and fragrance.

6. Chrysanthemum

Macro shot of pink chrysanthemum blooming flowers

chrysanthemum – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Chrysanthemum

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun/Partial Sun

As a master gardener, I’ve always admired the vibrant pink hues of Chrysanthemums, especially during the fall season.

Chrysanthemum plants bloom in autumn and early winter. It is a crowd favorite for fall and winter arrangements or decorations. Chrysanthemums are native to China and come in over 40 different species. This flower is believed to have medical properties that relieve pain and sore throats and help with minor gastrointestinal issues.

Growing these flowers successfully requires attention to detail. I recommend planting them in well-draining soil with full sun exposure for optimal growth and blooming. Consistent watering, and keeping the soil evenly moist, is necessary. Applying a slow-release fertilizer during the growing season provides the essential nutrients Chrysanthemums need.

Pests like aphids or spider mites can be a nuisance, but with careful monitoring and organic controls, they can be managed. With proper care, your Chrysanthemums will provide a spectacular display of pink, capturing the essence of autumn in your garden.

7. Hibiscus

Closeup shot of a blooming pink Hibiscus flower

Hibiscus – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Hibiscus

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 9+ (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial shrub

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Hibiscus features captivating pink blossoms with a tropical appeal. These beautiful pink flowers embody the tropical lushness of their native Pacific Rim. Hibiscus features a unique scent that has become popular in fragrances and an exotic flavor in food recipes and drinks.

To cultivate these beauties successfully, I recommend well-draining soil and a sunny location. Consistent watering is essential, ensuring the soil remains moist but not waterlogged. Also, applying a balanced slow-release fertilizer during the growing season provides the necessary nutrients for healthy growth and abundant flowering.

Pruning in early spring helps remove dead branches and encourages vigorous growth. Protecting the plant from cold temperatures is crucial, as most Hibiscus varieties are sensitive to frost.

With the right care and a warm climate, your pink Hibiscus will transport you to a tropical oasis, filling your garden with its exotic charm.

8. Cherry Blossom

Cherry blossom tree with blooming pink flowers in the park

Cherry Blossom (Prunus serrulata) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Prunus serrulata

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Tree

Sun Exposure: Full Sunlight

Cherry Blossom is a famous Japanese tree brought in 1912 to the United States to represent good foreign relations. Cherry Blossoms bloom in spring, and their branches fill with stunning pink flowers with a lovely scent.

As a master gardener who appreciates the delicate beauty of Cherry Blossoms, I’ve learned the art of cultivating these exquisite pink flowers over the years.

It all starts with well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade exposure. Regular watering keeps the soil consistently moist, while a slow-release fertilizer in early spring provides the necessary nutrients for healthy growth.

Pruning helps shape the tree and removes dead or diseased branches, promoting vibrant blooms. Protecting Cherry Blossom trees from extreme weather conditions and pests is essential for their well-being.

When the pink blossoms burst forth in spring, it creates a serene and picturesque atmosphere, bringing joy to any garden.

9. Dahlia

Closeup shot of a pink dahlia flower with yellow center and green leaves

Dahlia (Dahlia pinnata) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Dahlia pinnata

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Bulbs, Perennials

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Dahlias are a part of the Asteraceae family and come in over 40 different species originating in Mexico. Dahlias symbolize grace, kindness, and femininity and are known for their unique petal structure.

Dahlias are true showstoppers in the garden with their stunning pink blooms. They are a part of the Asteraceae family and come in over 40 different species originating in Mexico. Dahlias symbolize grace, kindness, and femininity and are known for their unique petal structure.

To grow these magnificent flowers successfully, I recommend well-draining soil enriched with organic matter. They thrive in full sun but can tolerate partial shade in hot climates.

Consistent watering is crucial, ensuring the soil remains moist but not waterlogged. Applying a balanced fertilizer every four to six weeks during the growing season supports vigorous growth and abundant blooms. Deadheading faded flowers encourages continuous flowering and staking tall varieties prevents them from toppling over in strong winds.

In colder regions, digging up the tubers before the first frost and storing them indoors ensures their survival. With proper care and attention, your pink Dahlias will steal the spotlight, gracing your garden with their unparalleled beauty.

10. Hollyhock

Blooming pink flowers of hollyhock (Alcea rosea)

Hollyhock (Alcea rosea) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Alcea Rosea

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

As a master gardener, I have grown these tall and majestic flowers in my garden often and they never fail to impress me.

The lovely hollyhock makes for picture perfect home facade and works great for privacy if placed along a fence line. They can grow along a trellis or by themselves in a garden setting.

To grow Hollyhocks successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seeds or seedlings in early spring or late fall, ensuring they have enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells. Stake the tall stems to support their height and prevent them from toppling over in strong winds.

Deadheading faded flowers encourages continuous blooming and helps the plant redirect its energy. With proper care and a touch of grandeur, your Hollyhocks will reach for the sky, displaying their vibrant pink blossoms.

11. Pink Hydrangea

Blooming flowers of pink hydrangea with green leaves

Pink hydrangea – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Hydrangea

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun/Partial Shade

Hydrangeas can be easily recognized for their mini-like flower bouquets that grow upon their green-leafed bushes. There are over 70 types of hydrangea, all of which require a good amount of water if you want to grow them.

These beautiful shrubs produce large, stunning flower clusters in shades of pink. To cultivate healthy Pink Hydrangeas, I recommend planting them in well-draining soil with partial shade exposure. Regular watering is crucial, especially during hot and dry periods.

Remember, the color of the flowers can vary depending on the soil pH, so adjusting its acidic or alkaline levels may alter the pink shade. With proper care and a touch of nature’s magic, your Pink Hydrangeas will flourish and mesmerize.

12. Pink Hyacinth

Focus shot of pink hyacinth flowers with green leaves in the garden

Pink hyacinth – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Hyacinthus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Sun

The fragrant Pink Hyacinth is a true delight for the senses. Native to the Mediterranean region, hyacinths had their heyday during the Vicotria Era. These flowers need to be planted in fall to bloom properly in spring.

I have grown these bulbs in my garden and their vibrant pink blooms never cease to amaze me. To cultivate these beauties successfully, plant the bulbs in well-draining soil in a location that receives full sun to partial shade. Regular watering is necessary, to ensure the soil remains evenly moist.

After the flowers fade, allow the foliage to wither naturally to provide energy for next year’s blooms. A layer of mulch around the base of the plants helps conserve moisture and suppress weed growth.

The hyacinth bulbs are poisonous and should be handled carefully with proper tools like gloves. With proper care, your garden will be filled with the intoxicating fragrance and stunning beauty of Pink Hyacinths.

13. Pink Meadowsweet

Selective focus of the pink flowers and green leaves of the Pink Meadowsweet

Pink Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Filipendula ulmaria

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Sun

Pink Meadowsweet features stunning pink flowers that bloom in thin, delicate clusters and grow 3-7 feet tall. This flower’s whimsical feel makes it an excellent choice for event decor.

This perennial herb produces clusters of small, pink flowers atop tall stems, adding elegance to any garden. Meadowsweets can be used to treat colds and digestive issues.

To grow Pink Meadowsweet successfully, choose a location with well-draining soil and partial shade. Regular watering is essential, keeping the soil evenly moist. Deadheading faded flowers promotes continuous blooming. Pruning the plant back in early spring helps maintain its shape and encourages vigorous growth.

Pink Meadowsweet attracts beneficial insects and pollinators, making it a wonderful addition to any wildlife-friendly garden. With the right care and attention, your Pink Meadowsweet will create a charming display of pink blooms and provide a haven for nature’s creatures.

14. Peony

Pink blooming flowers of peony in the garden under the sun

peony – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Peonia

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

The magnificent Peony features lush, fragrant blooms. These pink blooms are native to Asia, Southern Europe, and North America and have captivated people for centuries. Peonies can live for over 100 years and still produce fragrant flowers.

As a seasoned gardener, I have grown various pink varieties of Peonies, and they always steal the show. To cultivate these beauties, choose a sunny spot with well-draining soil. Prepare the soil by adding organic matter to improve fertility and drainage.

Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells. Mulching around the base helps conserve moisture and suppress weed growth.

With proper care and a little patience, your garden will be graced with the breathtaking beauty of Pink Peonies.

15. Pink Orchid

Macro of pink orchids blooming in the garden

Pink orchid – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Orchidaceae

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

With around 30,000 species, orchids are among the most popular flowering plants. These exotic and beautiful flowers represent luxury and beauty and are notoriously difficult to care for, but with some love and a solid understanding, you can care for yours.

To grow Pink Orchids, provide them with a well-draining potting mix formulated specifically for orchids. Place the orchid in a location with bright, indirect light, away from direct sunlight.

Orchids prefer a warm and humid environment, so maintaining proper humidity levels is crucial. Watering should be done when the potting mix starts to dry out slightly, but avoid overwatering, as it can lead to root rot.

Fertilize the orchid with a balanced orchid fertilizer according to the package instructions. With the right balance of light, humidity, and care, your Pink Orchid will reward you with its graceful blooms.

16. Pink Primrose

Blooming flowers of pink primrose with shades of white, yellow, and pink in its petals

Pink Primrose (Primula vulgaris) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Primula vulgaris

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial shade

Pink Primrose, also known as “pink ladies,” features dainty pink blooms that can be spotted by their pastel or deep pink colored petals that fade into a light pink inner circle. Primroses are low maintenance and can come in non-pink options such as yellow, white, blue, and purple.

To grow Pink Primroses successfully, choose a location with well-draining soil and partial shade. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist but not waterlogged. Deadheading faded flowers promotes continuous blooming.

While Pink Primroses are relatively low maintenance, but they do benefit from dividing the clumps every few years to maintain their vigor. With proper care and a touch of spring magic, your Pink Primroses will paint your garden with their delicate pink hues.

17. Petunia

Dark pink blooming flowers of petunia with green leaves

Petunia – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Petunia

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annuals

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Petunias are versatile and can be grown in containers, hanging baskets, or flower beds, adding a splash of pink to any space. With proper care and a bit of color, your Pink Petunias will create a stunning display that brightens up your garden.

Native to South America, Petunias come in a wide range of colors, but pink is the most common color. Petunias grow well in planters but can also be used as ground cover.

To cultivate healthy Pink Petunias, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Regular watering is crucial, especially during hot and dry spells. Deadheading spent flowers not only keeps the plants looking tidy but also promotes continuous blooming.

With proper care and a bit of color, your Pink Petunias will create a stunning display that brightens up your garden.

18. Pink Spider Lily

Pink spider lilies with green leaves in the garden

Pink Spider Lily (Hymenocallis littoralis) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Hymenocallis littoralis

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Bulbs, perennials

Sun Exposure: Partial sun

The Pink Spider Lily, with its unique and captivating flowers, has always intrigued me in my many years as a gardener. Although spider lilies are commonly seen in red and white colors, pink spider lilies are equally beautiful. This flower received its name from its long stamen that resembles spider legs.

To grow these beauties, choose a location with well-draining soil and partial shade. Pink Spider Lilies prefer moist soil, so regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods. The bulbs should be planted with the neck slightly above the soil level.

After flowering, allow the foliage to wither naturally before removing it. This allows the plant to store energy for the next blooming season.

Pink Spider Lilies can be left undisturbed for several years but may benefit from division to maintain their vigor. They are mildly toxic, so keep them out of reach. With the right care and a touch of mystique, your Pink Spider Lilies will mesmerize with their unusual beauty.

19. Pink Rose

Blooming pink flowers of pink rose on a white fence

Pink roses – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Rosa

Hardiness Zones: 7+ (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full to partial sun

Although each rose, color means something different, roses, in general, are a classic representation of beauty and love, making it a perfect choice for anniversaries and Valentine’s Day.

Pink roses represent blossoming love, affection, and admiration. Roses bloom mid-spring to early fall and require minimal pruning to keep them at their best.

To grow Pink Roses successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Proper soil preparation, including adding organic matter, ensures good drainage and fertility. Regular watering is incredibly important, especially during hot and dry spells.

Mulching around the base of the plants will help conserve moisture and suppress weed growth., while pruning in late winter or early spring helps maintain the shape and promotes healthy growth. With proper care, your garden will be filled with the enchanting fragrance and timeless beauty of Pink Roses.

20. Rocket Trumpet

Closeup on the red flowers of rocket trumpet on a sunny day

Rocket trumpet – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Mandevilla

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Vine

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Rocket Trumpet (Mandevilla) are unique flowers, with their elongated trumpet-like shape, adding a touch of intrigue. These flowers give off a beautiful tropical vibe making them a great option to grow on trellises, building facades, and fences. Mandevilla flowers grow best in warmer climates but can be brought inside during cold conditions.

To cultivate Rocket Trumpets successfully, choose a location with well-draining soil and full sun exposure. Regular watering is necessary, to keep the soil evenly moist. Adding a layer of mulch around the base of the plants helps conserve moisture and suppress weed growth.

Rocket Trumpets are heavy feeders, so I recommend applying a balanced fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season to support their growth and blooming.

With proper care and a hint of mystery, your Rocket Trumpets will captivate with their extraordinary form and delicate pink blossoms.

21. Lotus

Blooming pink lotus with a yellow center in a pond

Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Nelumbo nucifera

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 12 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Sacred to Buddhists, lotus flowers represent enlightenment as they can bloom beautifully above muddy or murky water. These flowers are often seen floating through ponds but can be planted in pea gravel and a water container.

To grow Lotus successfully, choose a sunny location in a large container or pond. Lotus prefer still water and thrive in a mix of clay and loam soil.

Plant the Lotus tubers in a container or directly in the pond, with the tubers partially submerged and the leaves floating on the water’s surface.

Regular watering is necessary to maintain the water level. Fertilizing with a balanced aquatic plant fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season supports vigorous growth and blooming. It’s important to note that lotus plants are heavy feeders and benefit from rich organic matter.

With proper care and a touch of tranquility, your garden will be transformed into a serene oasis with the exquisite pink blooms of Lotus flowers.

22. Snapdragon

Macro of the pink flowers of snapdragon

Snapdragon – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Antirrhinum

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennials

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Snapdragon received its name because of how its blooms resemble a dragon’s snout and mouth. These fabulous flowers grow in clusters at the top of the stem, creating a thick pink bloom cluster that pops against the green foliage.

These vibrant annuals add vertical interest and a splash of color to any flower bed or container. To grow Pink Snapdragons, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Regular watering is incredibly important to make sure that the soil remains evenly moist.

Snapdragons are versatile and can be used as cut flowers or in garden borders, attracting pollinators with their nectar-rich blooms. With proper care and a bit of whimsy, your Pink Snapdragons will create a lively display in your garden.

23. Tulips

Pink tulips growing in a garden

Tulips – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Tulip

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full to partial sun

Tulips are stunning flowers that are a beautiful representation of true love and nurturing. Theybloom from late spring to early summer, making them great for Mother’s Day, Easter, and other spring celebrations.

o cultivate healthy Tulips, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the bulbs in the fall, before the first frost, at a depth that is roughly three times the bulb’s height. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods.

After the flowers fade, allow the foliage to wither naturally, as it provides energy for next year’s blooms. Tulips can be grown in flower beds or containers, adding a burst of pink to your garden in spring.

With proper care and a touch of elegance, your Pink Tulips will create a striking display, signaling the arrival of a new season.

25. Gerbera Daisy

Blooming pink flowers of Gerbera daisy in the garden

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gerbera jamesonii

Hardiness Zones: 6 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial (zone dependent), Annual

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

This early flowering perennial comes in various colors, pink and yellow being the most popular. Gerbera Daisies are spectacular and span a whole half foot with 10-inch leaves.

To grow Gerbera Daisies successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant them in the spring or early summer, ensuring that the crown of the plant sits slightly above the soil surface. Regular watering is necessary to keep the soil evenly moist, but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot.

Deadhead faded flowers regularly to encourage continuous blooming. Make sure to fertilize the plants with a balanced flower fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season to support healthy growth and vibrant blooms.

With proper care and a touch of cheer, your Gerbera Daisies will brighten up your garden with their beautiful pink petals.

26. Stargazer

Closeup shot of the pink flowers of Stargazer (Lilium orientalis 'Stargazer')

Stargazer (Lilium orientalis ‘Stargazer’) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Lilium orientalis ‘Stargazer’

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial bulb

Sun Exposure: Full to partial sun

Stargazer is a type of lily that has bright pink petals and long stamen that emit a sweet scent. The spotted vibrant pink petals of the stargazer lily (which represents ambition and wealth) have made it a mainstay in many arrangements and bouquets.

To grow Stargazer Lilies properly, choose a location with well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. Plant the bulbs in the spring, at a depth that is roughly three times the bulb’s height. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil moist but not waterlogged. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain moisture and suppress weed growth.

Stargazer Lilies benefit from regular fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer during the growing season. Support the tall stems with stakes to prevent them from bending or breaking in strong winds.

With proper care and a touch of enchantment, your Stargazer Lilies will fill your garden with their mesmerizing pink blooms and sweet fragrance.

27. Pink Zinnia

Macro shot of a pink zinnia flower with green leaves

Pink zinnia – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Zinnia

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Zinnias come in various forms; they can have single, double, or semi-double petals, determining their clustered look.

These flowers grow naturally in the Southern United States and throughout Central and South America, with a large concentration in Mexico, making them heat, humidity, drought, and direct sunlight resistant.

Plant the seeds directly in the garden after the last frost date or start them indoors and transplant them when the weather warms up. Regular watering is necessary, to ensure the soil remains evenly moist.

Pink Zinnias attract butterflies and pollinators, adding life and color to your garden. With proper care and a touch of vibrancy, your Pink Zinnias will create a dazzling display of pink petals.

28. Abilene Early Large-Flowered Clematis

Macro shot of the pink flowers of Abilene Early Large-Flowered Clematis

Abilene Early Large-Flowered Clematis – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Clematis’ Abilene’ (Early Large-Flowered Group)

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full to partial sun

This annual flower has delicately ruffled leaves and beautiful pink petals and can reach up to 4 feet in height, blooming in late summer.

Plant the vine in a hole deep enough to accommodate the root ball, and ensure the crown sits level with the soil surface. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods. Apply a layer of mulch around the base of the plant to conserve moisture and suppress weed growth.

Abilene Clematis benefits from regular fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Prune the vine in late winter or early spring to control its size and promote vigorous growth.

With proper care and a touch of elegance, your Abilene Clematis will grace your garden with its stunning pink flowers.

29. Sweetpea

Focus shot of the pink flowers of sweetpea

Sweetpea (Lathyrus odoratus) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Lathyrus odoratus

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full to partial sun

These pink blooms are known for their distinctive sweet scent, frequently found in soaps, lotions, and fragrances. The sweetpea’s delicate fragrance matches its dainty pink flowers that top off thin stems.

Although they are small in size, sweetpeas make a significant impact in bouquets, floral arrangements, and gardens thanks to their sizeable scent.

Plant the seeds in early spring, either directly in the garden or start them indoors and transplant when the weather warms up. Regular watering is necessary, ensuring the soil remains evenly moist.

Adding organic matter to the soil before planting provides essential nutrients and improves drainage. Sweetpeas are climbers and will benefit from a trellis or support structure to climb upon.

With proper care and a touch of nostalgia, your Sweetpeas will fill your garden with their delightful pink blooms and enchanting fragrance.

30. Candy Mountain Foxglove

Rows of pink and white flowers of Candy Mountain Foxglove

Candy Mountain Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea ‘Candy Mountain’) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Digitalis purpurea’ Candy Mountain.’

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 7 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

These super tall perennial flowers are full of large, bell-like rosy pink blooms with spotter’s throats. Candy Mountain Foxgloves’ unique shape attracts hummingbirds and other pollinators to feed off its nectar.

To grow Candy Mountain Foxgloves successfully, choose a location with partial shade to full sun and well-draining soil.

Plant the seedlings or seeds in early spring or late summer, ensuring they have enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells. Plus, mulching around the base of the plants helps retain moisture and suppress weed growth.

Candy Mountain Foxgloves may require staking to support their tall flower spikes. Deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming and prevent self-seeding.

With proper care and a touch of whimsy, your Candy Mountain Foxgloves will add a playful charm to your garden with their pink, bell-shaped flowers.

31. Pink Candytufts

Macro of the pink flowers of pink candytufts with water droplet

Pink Candytufts (Iberis sempervirens) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Iberis sempervirens

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Truly resembling rippling ribbon sweets or little tufts, Candytufts fill any near-ground open areas with abundant bloom. While this flower may look like candy, it certainly doesn’t smell like it. It is recommended to keep candytuft far from open windows as its odor can be unpleasant.

Plant the seedlings or seeds in early spring or fall, spacing them to allow for their spreading habit. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods. Prune the plants lightly after blooming to maintain their shape and promote compact growth.

Pink Candytufts are relatively low maintenance and make excellent edging plants or groundcovers. With proper care and a touch of grace, your Pink Candytufts will carpet your garden with their lovely pink flowers, creating a picturesque scene.

32. Lilac Bush

Pink and white flowers of lilac bush with green leaves

Lilac Bush (Syringa reticulata) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Syringa reticulata

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Deciduous shrub

Sun Exposure: Full sun

These deciduous plants are distinctive due to their rich colors and intense fragrance. Lilac bushes’ most common colors are purple, lilac, and pinkish shades. This shrub blooms better when planted in well-drained soil and exposed to full sun.

To grow Lilac Bushes successfully, choose a location with full sun exposure and well-draining soil. Plant the shrub in the spring or fall, ensuring it has enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells. Mulching around the base of the plant helps retain moisture and suppress weed growth.

Lilac Bushes benefit from annual fertilization in early spring with a balanced shrub or flower fertilizer. Pruning should be done immediately after blooming to shape the shrub and encourage vigorous growth.

With proper care and a touch of nostalgia, your Lilac Bush will fill your garden with its iconic pink blossoms and sweet fragrance, reminiscent of springtime memories.

33. ‘Dark Eyes’ Fuchsia

Lantern-like flowers of Dark Eye Fuchsia with shades of pink and violet and green leaves

‘Dark Eyes’ Fuchsia – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Fuchsia hybrid ‘Dark Eyes’

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Shrubs

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

This annual flower is always a superstar in outdoor environments due to its unique draping lantern-like flowers that come in two overflowing colors. This shrub is usually planted in hanging pots for a more significant blooming effect.

Plant it in well-draining soil rich in organic matter. Regular watering is crucial, keeping the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Fuchsia plants appreciate regular fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer during the growing season to support healthy growth and abundant blooms.

Pruning is essential to maintain a compact and bushy shape. Pinch back the growing tips regularly to encourage branching and more flowers.

With proper care and a touch of enchantment, your Dark Eye’s Fuchsia will captivate your garden with its pink and purple blooms.

34. Pink Wisteria

Pink wisteria tree with pink blooms

Pink wisteria – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Wisteria

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Wisterias are high-climbing vine blooms and large clusters of tiny blossoms during spring. This flower is often used for cascading outdoor decoration, and it can reach up to 30 feet in length. This aromatic flower attracts different pollinators like butterflies, birds, and bees.

To grow Pink Wisteria successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Provide a sturdy structure such as a trellis or pergola for the vine to climb. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells.

Pruning is essential to control its growth and promote better flowering. Prune in late winter or early spring, removing any unwanted shoots and maintaining a balanced framework.

Pink Wisteria benefits from fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. With proper care and a touch of elegance, your Pink Wisteria will grace your garden with cascades of delicate pink flowers.

35. Lychnis Coronaria

Macro shot of the pink flower of Lychnis Coronaria

Lychnis Coronaria (Silene coronaria) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Silene coronaria

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Although this perennial is known for its short living conditions of only a couple of years, having this plant is a rewarding experience. This plant has beautiful green foliage and vibrant pink flowers atop tall stains.

To cultivate Lychnis Coronaria successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in early spring or fall, spacing them to allow for their growth. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods.

Lychnis Coronaria is a hardy perennial and requires minimal maintenance. With proper care and a touch of vibrancy, your Lychnis Coronaria will add a pop of pink to your garden, attracting butterflies and bees with its nectar-rich blossoms.

36. Dianthus

Pink flowers of Dianthus growing in the field

Dianthus (Dianthus caryophyllus) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Partial Sun

Dianthus, also known as clove pink, is a flower that has deep, vibrant pink flowers atop a long stem. These beautiful pink flowers have a distinctive cinnamon-like mild fragrance.

Plant the seedlings or seeds in early spring, ensuring they have enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist. Deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming and prevent seed formation.

Dianthus appreciates light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer during the growing season. These compact plants are excellent for borders, rock gardens, or containers, adding a touch of elegance with their pink blooms.

With proper care and a touch of sweetness, your Dianthus will fill your garden with its delightful presence.

37. Chenille

Deep pink velvety flowers of Chenille

Chenille (Acalypha hispida) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Acalypha hispida

Hardiness Zones: 10 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial, Annual (when grown in containers)

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

The Chenille flower, also known as monkey tail or red-hot cattail, has deep pink velvety flowers that resemble a caterpillar.

To cultivate Chenille successfully, choose a location with full sun to partial shade and well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in early spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged.

Chenille appreciates light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season. Pruning is essential to maintain a compact shape and promote bushier growth. Trim the branches after flowering to encourage new growth.

With proper care and a touch of curiosity, your Chenille will add a unique touch to your garden with its fascinating pink, tassel-like blooms.

38. Gaura

Selective focus of the pink flowers of Gaura

Gaura (Oenothera lindheimeri) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Oenothera lindheimeri

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Gaura is a nectar-rich flower plant with light and pink veins across its petals and can reach 15 to 48 inches long.

To grow Gaura successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells.

Gaura is a relatively low-maintenance plant and requires minimal fertilization. Deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming and prevent self-seeding.

With its delicate pink blossoms that sway with the breeze, Gaura adds a touch of grace and movement to your garden. With proper care and a touch of elegance, your Gaura will create a whimsical display of pink flowers.

39. Camellia

Pink blooming flowers of Camellia with green leaves

Camellia (Camellia japonica) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Camellia japonica

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial shrub

Sun Exposure: Partial-full shade

Also known as rose winter, Camellias form a rosette pattern and bloom in various different pink shades.

To cultivate Camellias successfully, choose a location with partial shade and well-draining, acidic soil. Plant the shrub in the spring or fall, ensuring the root ball is level with the soil surface.

Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist but not waterlogged. Mulching around the base of the plant helps retain moisture and suppress weed growth.

Camellias benefit from annual fertilization with a specialized acidic plant fertilizer in early spring. Pruning is essential to maintain the desired shape and promote better air circulation.

With proper care and a touch of sophistication, your Camellias will fill your garden with their exquisite pink blooms, turning heads with their sheer beauty.

40. Pink Firecracker Flower

Reddish pink flowers of Pink Nasturtium with green leaves under the sun

Reddish pink flowers of Pink Nasturtium with green leaves under the sun

Botanical Name: Crossandra infundibuliformis

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual, Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial sun

The firecracker flower has showy blossoms that not only lure humans in but butterflies and bees as well! This annual/perennial flower flourishes from summer to fall. With its striking pink tubular blooms that resemble firecrackers, this unique flower will add a touch of excitement and visual interest to your garden.

Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, ensuring the soil remains evenly moist. Pink Firecracker appreciates light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season.

With proper care and a touch of boldness, your Pink Firecracker Flower will steal the show.

41. Ivy Geranium

Macro shot of the blooming pink flowers of Ivy Geranium

Ivy Geranium (Pelargonium peltatum) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Pelargonium peltatum

Hardiness Zones: 10 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

This trailing Geranium creates light pink flowers with a distinctive pattern of darkish pink hue over its petals. The pink flower name of this ivy Geranium variety is called Geranium Ann Folkard.

With its cascading branches and delicate pink blooms, Ivy Geraniums add a touch of elegance and grace to any garden setting.

To grow Ivy Geraniums successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant them in containers or hanging baskets filled with quality potting mix. Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings.

Ivy Geraniums appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season. Pinch back the growing tips to encourage bushier growth and more flowers.

With proper care and a touch of versatility, your Ivy Geraniums will create stunning displays of pink flowers, cascading beautifully from containers or hanging baskets.

42. Lenten Rose

Blooming pink flowers of Lenten Rose with a yellow center

Lenten Rose (Helleborus orientalis) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Helleborus orientalis

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial-full sun

This pink flower blooms in early spring and does best in full sun to part shade and in a well-drained, hummus-rich garden. The pink flower name variety of the Lenten Rose is called Helleborus’ Paris in Pink.’

With its charming pink blossoms and early bloom time, Lenten Rose will bring a touch of elegance and color to your garden in late winter or early spring.

Plant the perennial in early spring or fall, ensuring the crown is level with the soil surface. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods.

Lenten Rose is a low-maintenance plant and requires minimal fertilization. Mulching around the base of the plant helps conserve moisture and suppress weed growth. Pruning is not necessary, but removing any damaged or yellowing leaves can improve the plant’s appearance.

With proper care and a touch of anticipation, your Lenten Rose will reward you with its lovely pink blooms.

43. Pink Nasturtium

Reddish pink flowers of Pink Nasturtium with green leaves under the sun

Pink Nasturtium – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Tropaeolum

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial/annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Nastrium is a plant with funnel-shaped flowers that come in vibrant pinkish shades. To grow pink Nastrium, you need Cherry Rose Jewel Nasturtium Seeds. With its vibrant pink flowers and peppery edible leaves, Pink Nasturtium will add a pop of color and flavor to your garden.

Plant the seeds directly in the garden after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings.

Pink Nasturtium is a relatively low-maintenance plant and does not require heavy fertilization. Deadhead faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming and prevent seed formation. The plant’s trailing habit makes it perfect for containers, hanging baskets, or cascading over garden walls.

With proper care and a touch of culinary creativity, your Pink Nasturtium will make a delightful addition to salads and garnishes and your garden!

Fun fact: Nastrium flowers are edible!

44. False Goat’s Beard

Blooming light pink flowers of False Goat’s Beard growing in the garden

False Goat’s Beard – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Astilbe

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial to full shade

Astilbe is a flowering genus commonly called false spirea and false goat’s beard. These plants feature fern-like luscious foliage, but most are loved for their cone-like feathery blossoms that grow in bright colors.

To cultivate False Goat’s Beard successfully, choose a location with partial shade to filtered sunlight and moist, well-draining soil.

Plant the perennial in the spring or fall, ensuring the root ball is level with the soil surface. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Mulching around the base of the plant helps retain moisture and suppress weed growth.

With its feathery pink plumes and graceful form, False Goat’s Beard adds a touch of elegance and texture to your garden.

False Goat’s Beard benefits from annual fertilization in early spring with a balanced flower fertilizer. Pruning is not necessary, but removing spent flower stalks can improve the plant’s appearance.

With proper care and a touch of serenity, your False Goat’s Beard will create a stunning display of pink blossoms.

45. Impatiens

Light pink and dark pink flowers of Impatiens with green leaves growing in the garden

Impatiens – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Impatiens

Hardiness Zones: 10 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial sun

The impatiens genus contains over 1,000 species of plants that produce vibrant, colorful flowers. These flowers grow compact and close to the ground, making them perfect as containers, bedding, or border plants.

With their compact growth habit and profusion of pink blooms, Impatiens are perfect for borders, containers, and hanging baskets. They bring a burst of color to shaded areas where other flowers may struggle.

To grow Impatiens successfully, choose a partially shaded location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist.

Impatiens appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer every few weeks during the growing season. Make sure to deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming.

With proper care and a touch of versatility, your Impatiens will create a vibrant and cheerful pink display in your garden.

46. Cosmos

Pink, red, and white flowers of Cosmos with green leaves

Cosmos – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Cosmos

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

With a name that creates starry heaven pictures in your head, Cosmo plants can create a galaxy in your garden. These flowers bloom with bright faces in various colors, including all pink shades.

Plant the seeds directly in the garden after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells. Cosmos is a relatively low-maintenance plant and does not require heavy fertilization.

Deadhead faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming and prevent self-seeding. With its daisy-like pink blooms and airy foliage, Cosmos adds a touch of charm and movement to your garden.

They are excellent for attracting butterflies and pollinators. With proper care and a touch of whimsy, your Cosmos will create a delightful pink display, swaying gently in the breeze.

47. Aster

Macro of a blooming pink aster flower with green leaves

Aster – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Aster

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Aster is a flowering genus of nearly 200 perennials that are commonly referred to as asters. This genus name comes from “star” in Greek, which accurately describes these plants’ daisy-like flowers that are both cheerful and starry.

To grow Asters successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring or fall, ensuring they have enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods.

Asters appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Pinch back the growing tips in early summer to promote bushier growth and more flowers.

With their daisy-like pink blooms and attractive foliage, Asters add a touch of elegance and grace to your garden. They are also excellent for attracting bees and butterflies.

With proper care and a touch of nostalgia, your Asters will create a beautiful pink display, reminiscent of traditional cottage gardens.

48. Moss Phlox ‘Pink’

Cluster of Moss Phlox ‘Pink’ flowers under the sun

Moss Phlox ‘Pink’ (Phlox subulate) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Phlox subulata

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

The Moss Phlox ‘Pink’ is an easy-to-grow five-petaled flower with a breathtaking shade of deep dark to lavender pink.

To cultivate Moss Phlox ‘Pink’ successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings in the spring, ensuring they are spaced properly to allow for their spreading growth habit. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells.

With its profusion of tiny pink flowers and evergreen foliage, Moss Phlox ‘Pink’ creates a stunning carpet of color, cascading beautifully over rock walls or in rock gardens.

With proper care and a touch of beauty, your Moss Phlox ‘Pink’ will transform your garden into a pink paradise.

49. Amaryllis

Macro of blooming pink amaryllis flowers isolated in a black background

Amaryllis – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Amaryllis

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial herbaceous

Sun Exposure: Partial sun

These breathtaking flower blooms are rare, but this experience is gratifying. The Amaryllis has trumpet-shaped flowers and is positioned atop a leafless stain measuring up to 2 feet tall.

Plant the bulb in a container or in the ground, ensuring the top third of the bulb remains above the soil surface.

Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings. Amaryllis benefits from monthly fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer during the growing season.

After flowering, reduce watering and allow the foliage to wither naturally.

With proper care and a touch of grandeur, your Amaryllis will reward you with large, trumpet-shaped pink blooms that will steal the spotlight in your garden or indoor space.

50. Lupine

Pink lupine flowers with green leaves growing in a lawn under the sun

Lupine – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Lupinus

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Often used as cut flowers or for floran decorations, Lupines grow well in full sunlight and well-drained soil conditions. These lovely blossoms come in various colors, including pink, blue, and purple, and can grow up to 5 feet, making it a great center filling of a garden patio area or an excellent background for shorter plants.

With their tall spikes of pink blossoms and palmate foliage, Lupines create a dramatic presence in the garden. They are also beneficial for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds.

Plant the seedlings or seeds in early spring or fall, ensuring they have enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells. Lupines appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. And deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming and prevent self-seeding.

With proper care and a touch of majesty, your Lupines will transform your garden into a vibrant pink paradise.

51. Periwinkle

Blooming pink and purple periwinkle flowers with green leaves

Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Catharanthus roseus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial-full sun

Periwinkle’s short height makes one of the main gardeners’ choices for a background of taller plants and ground cover. This flower’s color variety includes pink, purple, and blue. Periwinkle spreads quickly, so keep this in mind when looking for a planting area.

Plant the Periwinkle seedlings or seeds in the spring or fall, ensuring they have enough space to spread. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells, but be cautious not to overwater as it can lead to root rot.

Periwinkles are relatively low-maintenance plants and do not require heavy fertilization. With their trailing growth habit and dainty pink blooms, Periwinkles make excellent ground covers or additions to hanging baskets.

With proper care and a touch of tenacity, your Periwinkles will create a beautiful pink carpet in your garden.

52. Forget-me-not

Blooming pink forget-me-not flowers under the sun

Forget-me-not – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Myosotis

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Named after old stories of warriors wearing it not to be forgotten by their partners before they came back home, this plant is used in gardens because of its gentle beauty, low maintenance requirements, and easy self-spreading.

To grow Forget-me-nots successfully, choose a partially shaded location with moist, well-draining soil. Plant the seeds directly in the garden in early spring or fall. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist.

Forget-me-nots do not require heavy fertilization but appreciate a light application of compost or organic matter in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to prevent self-seeding.

With their clusters of tiny, soft pink blossoms and gentle, airy foliage, Forget-me-nots add a touch of romance and nostalgia to your garden. They are perfect for woodland gardens or as accents in borders.

With proper care and a touch of sentiment, your Forget-me-nots will create a pink tapestry of memories in your garden.

53. Columbine

Selective focus of pink columbine flowers in the garden

Columbine pink – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Aquilegia

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial shade

Columbine flowers can easily contribute to backyard heaven creation. These gentle flowers attract hummingbirds, and besides being relatively resistant to varying conditions, this is one of the main reasons why gardeners and garden planners very often choose them.

To cultivate Columbines successfully, choose a location with partial shade to filtered sunlight and well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring or fall, ensuring they have enough space to grow. Regular watering is necessary to keep the soil evenly moist.

Columbines appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming and prevent self-seeding.

With their nodding, spurred pink blossoms, and intricate foliage, Columbines add a touch of charm and sophistication to your garden. They are also attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.

With proper care and a touch of grace, your Columbines will create a stunning display of pink blooms in your garden.

54. Pink Daisy

Focus shot of pink daisy flowers with a green and yellow center

Pink daisy – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Bellis

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Regarding the color, daisies will always be a classic choice for gardeners. This flower’s color palette ranges from white through yellow to pink and blue. These flowers are easy to grow and care which makes them appropriate for any garden or floral arrangement.

With their iconic pink petals and golden centers, Pink Daisies bring a burst of joy and color to your garden. They are excellent for borders, cutting gardens, or naturalistic plantings.

To grow Pink Daisies successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings.

Pink Daisies appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming.

With proper care and a touch of cheerfulness, your Pink Daisies will create a vibrant pink display that will brighten your garden and put a smile on your face.

55. Thyme

Thyme growing in the field under the sun

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Thymus vulgaris

Hardiness Zones: 2 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Despite being an excellent herb that is often used for making tea and cooking recipes, thyme is also a unique addition to garden designs. Thyme grows relatively low in height, which makes it an excellent choice for ground cover purposes to use alongside pathways or to define borders.

To cultivate Thyme successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring after the last frost date. Thyme is drought-tolerant and requires minimal watering once established. Avoid overwatering, as it can cause root rot.

It’s is a low-maintenance herb and does not require heavy fertilization. Trim back the stems after flowering to maintain a compact shape and encourage fresh growth. With its tiny pink flowers and fragrant foliage, Thyme adds a delightful sensory experience to your garden. It is perfect for herb gardens, rock gardens, or as a ground cover.

With proper care and a touch of flavor, your Thyme will enhance your culinary adventures and fill your garden with its delightful pink blooms.

56. Pink Geranium

Macro shot of pink geranium flowers with dew drops on its petals

Pink geranium – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Pelargonium

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Geraniums are among most gardeners’ favorite flowers due to their long blooming periods. Geraniums bloom in early spring and come in various colors, such as pink, blue, yellow, apricot, red, burgundy, purple, and white.

With their vibrant pink blooms and lush, deeply lobed foliage, Pink Geraniums bring a touch of elegance and charm to your garden. They are excellent for borders, containers, or window boxes.

To grow Pink Geraniums successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings.

Pink Geraniums appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming and maintain a tidy appearance.

With proper care and a touch of reliability, your Pink Geraniums will reward you with a stunning display of pink flowers throughout the growing season.

57. Delphinium

Selective focus of the blooming pink flowers of Delphinium

Delphinium – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Delphinium

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 7 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

These flowers symbolize attachment which is based on the fact that they usually need support to stand and grow stable because they are very tall. Delphiniums are often used in indoor vase floral decorations and gardens for high-blooming accents.

With their towering spikes of delicate pink blossoms and finely cut foliage, Delphiniums create a sense of drama and elegance in your garden. They are perfect for cottage gardens, back borders, or as cut flowers.

To cultivate Delphiniums successfully, choose a location with full sun and fertile, well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring after the last frost date.

Regular watering is necessary, ensuring the soil remains consistently moist but not waterlogged. Delphiniums benefit from monthly fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer during the growing season. Stake tall varieties to provide support against strong winds.

With proper care and a touch of grandeur, your Delphiniums will make a statement with their breathtaking pink display.

58. Antirrhinum

Clusters of Antirrhinum with pink flowers and green leaves in the garden under the sun

Antirrhinum – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Antirrhinum

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Antirrhinums are perennial flowers with long blooming periods, so it is often picked for well-planned gardens that prefer having colorful blossoms until the first winter days.

With their distinctive, snapdragon-like pink blossoms and attractive spiky foliage, Antirrhinums add a touch of whimsy and color to your garden. They are excellent for borders, containers, or cottage-style gardens.

To grow Antirrhinums successfully, choose a location with full sun and well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist.

Antirrhinums appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming.

With proper care and a touch of playfulness, your Antirrhinums will create a vibrant pink tapestry in your garden.

59. Violet

Closeup shot of the pink flowers of violet

Violet – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Viola

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial shade

These flowers are often related to happiness and innocence and are not only an excellent colorful addition to your garden but can also be part of your homemade dishes as it is an edible plants. Violets come in various colors, including pink, purple, orange, blue, yellow, and burgundy.

With their fragrant, heart-shaped pink blooms and lush green foliage, Violets bring a touch of elegance and nostalgia to your garden. They are perfect for woodland gardens, rock gardens, or as accents in borders.

Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring or fall. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist. Violets do not require heavy fertilization but appreciate a light application of compost or organic matter in early spring. Mulch around the plants to help retain moisture.

With proper care and a touch of delicacy, your Violets will create a beautiful pink carpet that will enchant both you and your garden visitors.

60. Bergenia

Macro shot of the pink flowers of Bergenia

Bergenia – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Bergenia

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Sun

This lovely flower is often used for ground cover as it spreads relatively slowly. Bergenia flowers have dark green foliage with puffy pink rosettes full of tiny blossoms.

With their showy clusters of pink blossoms and thick, glossy leaves that turn bronze in winter, Bergenias add a touch of boldness and structure to your garden. They are excellent for borders, ground covers, or as accents in rock gardens.

To grow Bergenias successfully, choose a location with partial shade to full sun and moist, well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring or fall. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist.

Bergenias are relatively low-maintenance plants and do not require heavy fertilization. Deadhead faded flowers and trim back old foliage in early spring to promote fresh growth.

With proper care and a touch of resilience, your Bergenias will thrive and provide year-round interest with their captivating pink blooms.

61. Trifolium Rubens ‘Red Feathers’

Purplish pink flowers of Trifolium rubens ‘Red Feathers’ with green leaves growing in a field

Trifolium rubens ‘Red Feathers’ – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Trifolium rubens

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Despite being a wild flower, the Trifolium Rubens’ Red Feathers’ is often planted in back gardens because of its pretty blooms and its ability to attract pollinators like butterflies and bees. This plant blooms most when planted in moist soil and exposed to full sunlight.

With its fluffy, crimson-pink flowers that resemble feathery plumes and attractive trifoliate leaves, Trifolium Rubens ‘Red Feathers’ adds a touch of whimsy and texture to your garden. It is excellent for borders, rock gardens, or as a unique addition to wildflower meadows.

Plant the seedlings or seeds in the spring or fall, ensuring they have enough space to spread. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil evenly moist. This pink flower does not require heavy fertilization but appreciates a light application of compost or organic matter in early spring.

With proper care and a touch of curiosity, your Trifolium Rubens ‘Red Feathers’ will become a delightful focal point in your garden.

62. Rose Thrift

Pink blooms of rose thrifts with green stems

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Armeria maritima

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

What distinguishes this rose-like plant from other plants is that it is an easy-to-grow plant even in a rocky foundation. Rose thrift plants look great along the edge or board of a flower bed.

With its tufted clusters of dainty pink blooms and grass-like foliage, Rose Thrift brings a touch of elegance and softness to your garden. It is perfect for rock gardens, coastal gardens, or as edging plants.

To grow Rose Thrift successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings.

Rose Thrift appreciates light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming and maintain a tidy appearance.

With proper care and a touch of resilience, your Rose Thrift will create a stunning display of pink flowers that will endure throughout the seasons.

63. Turtlehead

Macro of a pink blooming turtlehead flower with green leaves

Turtlehead – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Chelone

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

The turtlehead flower is among the top picks when planning for an autumn-blooming piece of paradise. This plant gets its name from its blossom’s distinctive shape. Turtlehead flowers prefer swampy and muddy soil, but they can also be placed in shady areas with regular watering.

To cultivate Turtlehead successfully, choose a partially shaded location with moist, rich soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring or fall. Regular watering is necessary, to keep the soil consistently moist. Turtlehead appreciates light fertilization with compost or organic matter in early spring.

With its distinctive pink flowers that resemble the shape of a turtle’s head, Turtlehead adds a touch of curiosity and charm to your garden. It is perfect for woodland gardens, rain gardens, or as a focal point in moist areas.

With proper care and a touch of intrigue, your Turtlehead will thrive and delight both you and your garden visitors.

64. Coneflower

Groups of pink coneflower plants with green leaves blooming in the garden

Coneflower – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Echinacea

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Coneflower is the perfect choice if you’re looking for a plant that blooms regularly and continuously in summer and attracts tons of butterflies. This beauty is high-temperature and drought-tolerant, which makes it an excellent plant for beginners.

To grow Coneflowers successfully, choose a sunny location with well-draining soil. Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring after the last frost date.

Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings. Coneflowers appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to promote continuous blooming and prevent self-seeding.

With its large, daisy-like pink blossoms and prominent cone-shaped centers, Coneflower commands attention and adds a splash of color to your garden. It is excellent for borders, cottage gardens, or as cut flowers.

With proper care and a touch of vibrancy, your Coneflowers will create a bold and beautiful pink display that will captivate both you and your garden visitors.

65. Crabapple Tree

Vibrant pink blossoms of a crabapple tree in a lawn under the blue sky

Crabapple tree – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Malus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

These trees perfectly complete spring garden designs with their uniquely beautiful and vibrant pink blossoms. Crabapples grow best when exposed to full sun and can grow up to 25 feet tall.

With its abundance of delicate pink blossoms that transform the tree into a spectacle of color, the Crabapple Tree becomes a focal point in any garden. It provides not only beauty but also attracts pollinators.

Plant the sapling in the spring or fall, ensuring it has enough space to grow and spread its branches. Regular watering is necessary, especially during dry periods. Crabapple Trees benefit from yearly fertilization with a slow-release tree fertilizer in early spring. Prune the tree in late winter or early spring to shape it and remove any dead or damaged branches.

With proper care and a touch of grandeur, your Crabapple Tree will grace your garden with its magnificent pink blooms and add a touch of elegance to the landscape.

66. Anemone

Macro shot of a pink anemone flower isolated in a black background

Anemone – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Anemone

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial sun

These flowers are a crowd favorite due to their relatively long blooming period through spring, summer, and autumn seasons. Anemones symbolize luck; many perceive it as bringing spiritual peace of mind.

With their beautiful, cup-shaped pink flowers and attractive fern-like foliage, Anemones bring a touch of sophistication and romance to your garden. They are perfect for borders, woodland gardens, or as cut flowers.

To grow Anemones successfully, choose a partially shaded location with well-draining soil. Plant the corms in the spring or fall, ensuring they are placed at the appropriate depth. Regular watering is necessary, to keep the soil consistently moist. Anemones appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring.

With proper care and a touch of grace, your Anemones will dance in the breeze and create a dreamy pink display in your garden.

67. Veronica

Focus shot of a spiky Veronica flower with a bee in the garden

Veronica – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Veronica

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Veronicas come in a wide range of colors and varieties. They are considered ideal for small gardens that want to ad solid and colorful flowers and attract different pollinators. Veronica can grow from 6 inches to 3 feet in height- it all depends on the variety you pick.

With their spiky clusters of pink blossoms and slender, lance-shaped foliage, Veronicas add a touch of structure and color to your garden. They are excellent for borders, rock gardens, or as edging plants.

Plant the seedlings or young plants in the spring after the last frost date. Regular watering is necessary, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings. Veronicas appreciate light fertilization with a balanced flower fertilizer in early spring. Deadhead faded flowers to encourage continuous blooming and maintain a neat appearance.

With proper care and a touch of versatility, your Veronicas will create a delightful pink tapestry in your garden.

68. Dactylorhiza

Dark pink Dactylorhiza flower in a grass field

Dactylorhiza – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Dactylorhiza

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Also known as the marsh orchid, the Dactylorhiza is a lovely wild nature flower that can also grow in gardens. This beautiful flower has low-growing foliage and a high-rising stain full of stunning flower crowns. It is somewhat resistant to changes in its conditions, making it an excellent choice for low-maintenance gardens.

With their intricate pink blossoms and intricate patterns, Dactylorhizas add a touch of elegance and rarity to your garden. They are perfect for woodland gardens, shady borders, or as potted plants.

Plant the tubers or young plants in the spring or fall, ensuring they are placed at the appropriate depth. Regular watering is necessary, keeping the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Dactylorhizas appreciate light fertilization with a balanced orchid fertilizer in early spring. Provide support or stakes for taller varieties.

With proper care and a touch of fascination, your Dactylorhizas will reward you with their delicate pink blooms and become a conversation piece in your garden.

 

Other Flower Guides from Planet Natural:

49 Best Yellow Flowers for Gardens (Annuals and Perennials)

32 Stunning Green Flowers for Your Garden (With Pictures)