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49 Best Yellow Flowers for Gardens (Annuals and Perennials)

A young woman wearing a blue dress and a hat in a field full of yellow flowers

Are you looking for the perfect flower to add a pop of color? Look no further; this yellow flower list is for you! Yellow flowers are bright but still more inviting than red or orange cause they create a serene environment.

Whether you’re looking for a soft buttery hue, a vibrant citron, or a golden shade, any yellow flower will add a zing to your garden.

Yellow flowers have a cheerful, fun, and friendly vibe, which makes them the perfect addition to any garden, bouquet, or decoration. From perennials to annuals, from tiny to tall, there are plenty of beautiful yellow blossoms to go around.

In this guide, you will find not only descriptions of each flower but also invaluable insights into their care and cultivation. From planting tips to watering techniques, and deadheading practices to soil preferences, this master gardener’s guide will equip you with the knowledge and expertise to cultivate these yellow beauties with confidence.

So, let’s look at the different sunny shades available and which suits you and your zone best.

1. Hellebores

Yellow flowers of Hellebores under the light of the sun

Hellebores – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Helleborus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Hellebores

Hellebores, also known as Lenten roses, are stunning perennial flowers that brighten up any garden with their elegant yellow blooms.

This perennial has leathery leaves that protect a circle of small stamen-like petals. Hellebores have a long blooming period that lasts from 6 to 8 weeks and ranges in color from white, yellow, and purple. I recommend planting them in well-draining soil with partial shade to ensure their best performance.

Hellebores thrive in cool temperatures and appreciate consistent moisture, but avoid overwatering as it can cause root rot.

These hardy plants require minimal maintenance and are generally resistant to pests and diseases. Plus, pruning the faded flowers and leaves in early spring helps maintain their neat appearance and encourages new growth.

With proper care, Hellebores can grace your garden with their beautiful yellow flowers for years to come.

2. Corydalis

Selective focus of the yellow flowers of Corydalis with green leaves

Corydalis (Corydalis canadensis) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Corydalis canadensis

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 7 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial-full sun

Corydalis is a delightful flowering plant that adds a touch of charm to any garden setting. There are many Corydalis varieties, but the yellow version will surely add charm and character to any garden. This flower belongs to the poppy family and is a popular ornamental plant among gardeners.

As a master gardener, I recommend providing Corydalis with moist, well-drained soil and a location that receives partial shade. Regular watering is essential to keep the soil consistently moist, but be cautious not to overwater.

This perennial beauty thrives in cool climates and will benefit from a layer of mulch to conserve moisture and suppress weeds. Corydalis generally requires minimal pruning, but removing spent blooms and damaged foliage will keep the plant looking tidy.

With its delicate yellow flowers dancing in the breeze, Corydalis is sure to bring joy to your garden.

3. Rose

Selective focus of a yellow rose with green leaves in a garden

Rose – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Rosa

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Roses, the timeless beauties of the garden, also come in enchanting shades of yellow. With more than 2,000 varieties, roses have a long history and extensive family. Nowadays, roses offer endless color selections and all-season blooms -unlike old roses, which were generally more complicated and did not have a wide range of color variety.

I recommend selecting disease-resistant rose varieties for optimal success. Yellow roses thrive in well-drained soil enriched with organic matter and should be planted in an area that receives at least six hours of direct sunlight each day.

Adequate watering is crucial, ensuring the soil remains evenly moist but not waterlogged. Plus, regular pruning promotes healthy growth and enhances the plant’s appearance.

Keep an eye out for common rose pests like aphids and spider mites, and take appropriate measures to control them. With proper care, these yellow roses will infuse your garden with their elegance and fragrance.

4. Craspedia

Selective focus of a yellow craspedia flower

Craspedia (Craspedia globosa) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Craspedia globosa

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 11(USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Craspedia, also known as Billy buttons, woolly heads, or ‘golden drumsticks’, is a unique yellow flower that adds a touch of whimsy to any garden or floral arrangement. This tall shrub is a fantastic way to give a unique flair thanks to its length and dense yellow flowers.

I recommend planting Craspedia in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun exposure to partial shade. These hardy perennials can tolerate various soil conditions but perform best in moderately fertile soil.

While they are relatively drought-tolerant, regular watering is necessary during dry spells to maintain their vibrant yellow globular blooms. Deadheading spent flowers encourages prolonged blooming.

Craspedia makes for an excellent addition to cut flower arrangements, and their cheerful yellow spheres are sure to catch the eye in your garden.

5. Daffodil

Selective focus of blooming yellow daffodils in a garden

Daffodil – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Narcissus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Daffodils, the heralds of spring, bring a burst of sunshine with their bright yellow blooms. This valuable spring ornamental flower is an iconic bulb plant that offers charisma to any area with its glossy upturned leaves and beautiful trumpet-like flowers. Because this is a high-demand flower, there are tons of color variations.

I recommend planting daffodil bulbs in well-drained soil with full to partial sunlight. These hardy flowers prefer moderately fertile soil and require watering during dry spells. After blooming, allow the foliage to die back naturally to provide nourishment for the bulb’s future growth.

Daffodils multiply over time, and dividing them every few years helps maintain their vigor and abundance. With their vibrant yellow hues and delightful fragrance, daffodils are a must-have for any garden enthusiast.

6. Dahlia

Closeup view of a blooming yellow dahlia flower with green leaves in a garden

Dahlia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dahlia

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Dahlias are stunning flowering plants that offer an array of yellow hues, adding drama and color to any garden. This herbaceous perennial shares the same family as sunflowers and daisies. This flower has large, brightly colored flowers that range in various colors due to its popularity.

I recommend planting dahlias in well-drained soil enriched with organic matter. They thrive in full sun and require regular watering, keeping the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged.

Providing support for the tall varieties will prevent them from bending or breaking under the weight of their gorgeous blooms. Deadheading spent flowers and removing any damaged foliage promotes continuous blooming throughout the season.

Dahlias are also susceptible to pests like slugs and snails, so taking appropriate pest control measures is advisable. With their bold yellow flowers stealing the spotlight, dahlias are sure to captivate any garden admirer.

7. Calla Lily

Yellow calla lily flowers with green stem and leaves in the garden

Calla Lily – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Zantedeschia

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial shade

Calla lilies, with their elegant trumpet-shaped yellow flowers, exude sophistication and beauty. It’s a semi-green herbaceous perennial that grows off rhizomes.

These plants are very popular thanks to their elegant bell-like shaped petals. Calla lilies do well in gardens or as cut flowers and can grow both indoors and outdoors.

I suggest planting calla lilies in well-drained soil with partial shade. Adequate sunlight and moist, but not waterlogged, soil is crucial for their healthy growth. Regular watering, especially during dry spells, is necessary to keep the soil consistently moist.

Calla lilies appreciate a balanced fertilizer application during the growing season to promote vibrant blooms. While generally low-maintenance, removing faded flowers and yellowing foliage helps maintain their aesthetic appeal.

With their graceful form and exquisite yellow blossoms, calla lilies are sure to elevate the elegance of your garden.

8. Carnation

Macro of a yellow carnation flower

Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Herbaceous perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/partial shade

Carnations, with their ruffled yellow blooms, are classic favorites that bring both color and fragrance to any garden. They are herbaceous perennials popular for the spectrum of colors you can find them in. This plant grows full blooms of serrated petals on a narrow and long stalk.

I recommend planting carnations in well-drained soil with full sun exposure. These hardy perennials prefer moderately fertile soil and require regular watering, ensuring the soil remains evenly moist.

Deadheading spent flowers not only promotes continuous blooming but also enhances the plant’s appearance. Adequate air circulation is essential to prevent diseases, so avoid overcrowding the plants.

Carnations benefit from a light application of balanced fertilizer in early spring to fuel their growth. With their delightful yellow flowers and captivating scent, carnations make a wonderful addition to any garden or floral arrangement.

9. Yellow Oleander

Selective focus of blooming yellow oleander flowers with green leaves

Yellow Oleander (Nerium oleander) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Nerium oleander

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Yellow Oleanders are a stunning addition to any landscape if their goal is to brighten up. This bushy shrub grows in temperate and tropical areas and should be kept out of reach as it can be mildly toxic for pets and children.

When planting, choose a well-drained location with full sun exposure. Regular watering is necessary to establish the plant, but once established, it can tolerate periods of drought. Pruning in early spring helps maintain its shape and encourages new growth.

Remember to wear protective gloves and exercise caution when handling this plant, and keep it out of reach of children and pets. With its vibrant yellow blossoms, Yellow Oleander creates a stunning visual impact in the garden.

10. Hibiscus

Macro shot of a yellow hibiscus flower in the garden

Hibiscus – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Hibiscus

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun/Partial shade

Hibiscus plants are huge trumpet-like shaped blooms that grow on small trees and have dark green leaves.

There are two types of varieties: hardy and tropical; although they both are perennials, tropical hibiscus can be grown as annuals in some instances. I recommend planting it in well-drained soil enriched with organic matter.

These sun-loving plants thrive in full sun but appreciate some shade during the hottest part of the day. Regular watering is essential to keep the soil evenly moist, especially during dry spells. Applying a balanced fertilizer during the growing season promotes healthy foliage and abundant blooms.

Pruning in early spring stimulates new growth and helps maintain a compact shape. With its radiant yellow flowers and tropical allure, Yellow Hibiscus is sure to be a focal point in your garden.

11. Zinnia

Closeup view of a yellow zinnia flower with green leaves in the garden

Zinnia (Zinnia elegans) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Zinnia elegans

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Zinnia plants have bright daisy-shaped heads on a tall, slender stem. These flowers can grow up to 3 feet and can bloom annually. They come in various shades of yellow, adding a burst of color to any garden bed or container.

I suggest planting Zinnias in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun exposure. These heat-loving flowers thrive in warm weather and require regular watering, ensuring the soil remains evenly moist. Deadheading spent flowers not only keeps the plant tidy but also encourages continuous blooming.

Avoid overhead watering to prevent foliar diseases, and provide good air circulation to reduce the risk of mildew. With their cheerful yellow blooms and easygoing nature, Zinnias are a delightful addition to any garden.

12. Sunflower

Blooming sunflowers in the garden under the light of the sun

Sunflower – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Helianthus

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annuals

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Sunflowers, with their iconic yellow petals and towering presence, bring a sense of joy and radiance to any garden. These popular bright yellow flowers have big daisy-like shaped flower faces that surround a brown center that, when it rips, can be filled with seeds.

Sunflowers are extremely popular cut flowers and can often be found in floral arrangements as a pop of color. I recommend planting Sunflowers in a location that receives full sun for at least six hours a day.

These sun-loving plants prefer well-drained soil enriched with organic matter. While they are relatively drought-tolerant, regular watering is necessary, especially during dry spells, to encourage optimal growth and sturdy stems. Providing support, such as stakes or cages, will help the tall varieties withstand strong winds.

Deadheading spent blooms redirects the plant’s energy for continuous flowering. With their vibrant yellow flowers turning to face the sun, Sunflowers create a breathtaking display in the garden.

13. Yellow Butterfly Bush

Selective focus of a yellow butterfly bush with blooming flowers and green leaves

Yellow Butterfly Bush (Buddleia davidii) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Buddleia davidii

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Yellow Butterfly Bush, also known as Buddleja, is a magnet for butterflies and hummingbirds, making it a delightful addition to any wildlife garden. This perennial shrub has lance-shaped leaves and arching branches.

The butterfly bush is one of the most fragrant herbaceous bushes, attracting pollinators such as butterflies and hummingbirds. As a seasoned gardener, I recommend planting it in well-drained soil with full sun exposure. Regular watering is crucial, especially during hot and dry periods, to keep the soil consistently moist.

Pruning in early spring helps maintain its shape and promotes vigorous blooming. Deadheading spent flowers encourages a prolonged blooming period and reduces self-seeding.

With its fragrant yellow blossoms and the flurry of butterflies it attracts, Yellow Butterfly Bush brings a touch of magic to your outdoor space.

14. Chrysanthemum

Top view of yellow chrysanthemum flowers with green leaves

Chrysanthemum – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Chrysanthemum

HardinessZones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Better known as mums, these plants are a classic addition to fall gardens and floral arrangements. Chrysanthemum plants have hundreds of varieties that give you choices between height, color, size, and even bloom time.

I recommend planting Chrysanthemums in well-drained soil with full sun exposure. Adequate air circulation is important to prevent diseases, so avoid overcrowding the plants. Regular watering is necessary to keep the soil consistently moist but take care not to overwater as it can lead to root rot.

Pinching back the stems in early summer encourages bushier growth and more flowers. Chrysanthemums are generally hardy, but providing a layer of mulch in winter helps protect the roots from freezing temperatures.

With their captivating yellow flowers, Chrysanthemums will infuse warmth and beauty into any garden.

15. Dutch Hyacinth

Yellow Dutch hyacinth flowers in a wooden pot

Dutch Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Hyacinthus orientalis

Hardiness Zones: 10 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennials

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Dutch Hyacinths grow from a spring-blooming bulb. A ball-like a shaped cluster of nearly 20 individuals blooms on top of its slender stem. I recommend planting Dutch Hyacinths in well-drained soil enriched with organic matter.

These bulbs prefer full to partial sun and require regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist during the growing season.

Deadheading spent flowers maintains a neat appearance and encourages the plant’s energy to focus on bulb development. After the foliage turns yellow and dies back naturally, it’s essential to let the bulbs rest for a few months before replanting.

With their delightful fragrance and cheerful yellow blooms, Dutch Hyacinths herald the arrival of spring in your garden.

16. Daisy

Closeup shot of blooming yellow flowers of daisy

Daisy – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Asteraceae

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Daisies are charming and versatile flowers that brighten up any garden with their yellow blooms. They’re generally made up of white petals and yellow centers, but due to their popularity and genetic modification, daisies can come in different color varieties.

These flowers grow on a soft leafless stem. I recommend planting Daisies in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun or partial shade. These resilient perennials are relatively low-maintenance, requiring regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming and prevents self-seeding.

Daisies are generally pest and disease-resistant but keep an eye out for aphids and snails. Providing a layer of mulch helps conserve moisture and suppress weed growth. With their simple yet cheerful yellow flowers, Daisies bring a touch of whimsy to your garden.

17. Daylily

Selective focus of a yellow daylily flower in the garden

Daylily – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Hemerocallis

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Daylilies are reliable and stunning perennial flowers that grace the garden with their yellow blooms. Despite their delicate appearance, Daylilies are easy growers and quick spreaders.

This trumpet-like flower bloom grows on top of a slender, leafless stem. Daylily flowers can be found in different colors. I recommend planting Daylilies in well-drained soil enriched with organic matter.

These sun-loving plants prefer full sun but can tolerate some shade. Regular watering is necessary to establish the plants, but once established, they can tolerate periods of drought. Deadheading spent flowers keeps the plant looking tidy and encourages continuous blooming.

Dividing the clumps every few years helps maintain their vigor and promotes abundant flowering. With their vibrant yellow blossoms and easy-care nature, Daylilies are a garden favorite.

18. Graham Thomas Rose

Closeup view of yellow Graham Thomas rose flowers with green leaves in the garden

Graham Thomas Rose – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Rosa

Hardiness Zones: 5 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Graham Thomas Rose is a glorious yellow rose that exudes elegance and charm in any garden. This rose variety has all the classic characteristics you’d expect from regular roses but with deep yellow-gold colored petals that make it stand out from many flowers.

Graham Thomas roses are ideal for containers and hedges alike. I recommend planting them in well-drained soil enriched with organic matter. These roses thrive in full sun, requiring at least six hours of direct sunlight each day.

Regular watering is crucial, make sure the soil remains evenly moist but not waterlogged. Applying a balanced rose fertilizer during the growing season promotes vigorous growth and abundant blooms.

Pruning in early spring helps maintain the shape and encourages new growth. Keep an eye out for common rose pests like aphids and black spot, and take appropriate measures for pest and disease control.

With its classic beauty and captivating fragrance, Graham Thomas Rose is a timeless addition to any garden.

19. Goldenrod

Selective focus of yellow goldenrod flowers with green stems and leaves

Goldenrod – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Solidago

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Goldenrod is a cheerful perennial that adds a bright splash of yellow to late summer and fall gardens. They’re wildflowers with tall leafy stalks clustered blooms along the ends.

This flower blooms in late summer; as its name indicates, it has a deep yellow color. I recommend planting Goldenrod in well-drained soil with full sun exposure.

These hardy plants are drought-tolerant once established and require minimal watering. Providing support, such as stakes or cages, is advisable for the taller varieties to prevent bending or breaking.

Deadheading spent flowers maintains a neat appearance and prolongs blooming. Goldenrod is generally pest and disease-resistant, making it a low-maintenance addition to your garden.

With its golden-yellow plumes swaying in the autumn breeze, Goldenrod brings warmth and beauty to the landscape.

20. Yellow Tulip

Yellow tulips in the garden with sun rays

Yellow Tulip – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Tulipa spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Considered the Netherlands’ national flower, tulips are well known for their cup-like petals, making them one of the most recognizable plants on this list.

Tulips bloom in spring and grow only three petals around their sepals – each flower grows on a single stem. I recommend planting Yellow Tulips in well-drained soil with full to partial sun exposure.

These bulbs prefer cool temperatures and require regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist during their active growth period. Once the foliage turns yellow and dies back naturally, allow the bulbs to rest for a few months before replanting.

Yellow Tulips benefit from a layer of mulch to insulate the soil and conserve moisture. With their vibrant yellow blooms, Yellow Tulips create a vibrant and uplifting display in the spring garden.

21. Yarrow

Hand holding a bunch of yarrow plant with yellow flowers in the field

Yarrow – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Achillea

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

This hardy perennial plant has flower heads packed with tiny blooms that usually come in yellow or white. Yarrow flowers thrive on neglect and can die if they get overwatered.

I recommend planting Yarrow in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure. These hardy plants are drought-tolerant once established and require minimal watering. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and dividing the clumps every few years helps maintain their vigor.

Yarrow attracts pollinators and beneficial insects to the garden and makes an excellent addition to wildflower meadows or cottage-style gardens.

22. Prickly Pear

Closeup view of the blooming yellow flowers of prickly pear

Prickly Pear (Opuntia humifusa) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Opuntia humifusa

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Prickly Pear, also known as Opuntia, is a unique succulent plant that features distinct paddle-shaped pads and beautiful yellow flowers. It’s a versatile perennial cactus that can be found across the southern states but can grow as far north as Minnesota.

I recommend planting Prickly Pear in well-drained soil and providing it with ample sunlight. These drought-tolerant plants require minimal watering once established. However, take care when handling them, as the pads are covered in spines.

Prickly Pear is a resilient plant that adds texture and interest to desert-themed gardens or xeriscapes.

23. Iris

Selective focus of a yellow iris flower with green stem and leaves

Iris (Iris pseudacorus) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Iris pseudacorus

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Iris is a graceful and elegant flower that comes in a variety of colors, including shades of yellow.

Well known for attracting beer, it has showy flowers that emerge from spring to summer. Iris plants come in different colors, and their flowers sit at the top of their erect peduncles. Iris can sometimes cause dermatitis or skin irritation, so use caution when handling them.

I recommend planting yellow iris in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade. These perennial flowers appreciate regular watering, especially during the growing season, but the soil should not be waterlogged. Dividing the rhizomes every few years helps rejuvenate the plant and promote blooming.

With their exquisite blooms and distinct form, Iris flowers are sure to create a stunning focal point in any garden.

24. Black-Eyed Susan

Selective focus of a blooming yellow flower of a Black-eyed Susan with a black center

Black-Eyed Susan – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Rudbeckia

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Black-Eyed Susan, with its vibrant yellow petals and dark center, is a charming perennial flower that blooms from summer to fall. This sturdy, daisy-like plant has golden heads and dark brown centers.

Black Eyed Susans mix well with shrubs and annuals and can ideally add a patch of bright yellow to any space. I recommend planting it in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure. These hardy plants are drought-tolerant and require minimal watering once established. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming and prevents self-seeding.

Black-Eyed Susan attracts bees, butterflies, and other pollinators to the garden, making it a delightful addition to wildlife-friendly landscapes.

25. Primrose

Selective focus of yellow primrose flowers in the garden

Primrose – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Oenothera

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennials

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Primrose is a delightful spring flower that brightens up gardens with its clusters of blooms. It’s a fragrant goblet-shaped flower that can bloom in different colors, including yellow, white, or pink.

I recommend planting Primrose in well-drained soil and providing it with partial shade. These perennial flowers prefer cool temperatures and require regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist.

Primrose thrives in woodland gardens, rockeries, or container plantings, bringing a burst of color and cheerfulness to the early spring garden.

26. Snapdragon

Focus shot of a yellow snapdragon in the field

Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Antirrhinum majus

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennials

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Snapdragon is a charming annual flower with distinctive spikes of tubular-shaped blooms, including varieties in shades of yellow. Their popular mid-size plants come in most colors besides blue (its most popular color).

Snapdragons often grow with short bedding plants as they provide a welcome balance. I recommend planting Snapdragon in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade.

Regular watering is necessary to keep the soil evenly moist, especially during hot and dry periods. Removing faded flowers promotes continuous blooming, and pinching back the stems in early summer encourages bushier growth.

With their unique flowers and upright growth habit, Snapdragons add a touch of whimsy and vertical interest to flower beds and containers.

27. Pansy

Selective focus of a yellow pansy with a blue pansy on its back

Pansy (Viola wittrockiana) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Viola wittrockiana

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual/perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Pansy flowers come in various colors and can bloom in almost any season. These hardy annual/perennials do well as borders and ground covers.

As an experienced gardener, I suggest planting Pansies in well-drained soil and providing them with partial shade. These flowers prefer cooler temperatures and require regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist.

Deadheading spent flowers encourages continuous blooming, and providing a layer of mulch helps conserve moisture and suppress weed growth.

Pansies are excellent choices for borders, containers, or early spring displays, bringing color and charm to the garden.

28. Coreopsis

Selective focus of a blooming yellow coreopsis flower with dark green leaves

Coreopsis – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Coreopsis

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial/annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Coreopsis flowers can have shades of yellow and pink on their petals. These perennial/annual plants are similar in appearance to daisies and are native to North America

While this flower comes in many colors, yellow coreopsis has light yellow leaves with a dark orange center. I recommend planting Coreopsis in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure.

These drought-tolerant plants are relatively low-maintenance and require minimal watering once established. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming and encourages the plant’s energy to focus on new blooms.

Coreopsis is a great choice for attracting butterflies and pollinators, adding beauty and biodiversity to the garden.

29. Waterlily

A yellow waterlily in a pond

Waterlily (Nymphaea hollandia) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Nymphaea hollandia

Hardiness Zones: 1 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennials

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Waterlilies are captivating aquatic plants that grace ponds and water gardens with their elegant floating blooms, including varieties in shades of yellow.

These submerged aquatic perennials are surprisingly hardy despite their delicate appearance. Waterlilies can grow in a small tub or on a pond of any size.

Asides from purple and blue, waterlilies can bloom in all colors. I recommend planting them in containers or special planting baskets in water depths suitable for the specific variety. These plants require still water and full sun to thrive. Fertilizing with aquatic plant food tablets promotes healthy growth and abundant blooms.

Waterlilies bring a touch of serenity and beauty to aquatic landscapes, creating a tranquil oasis in your garden.

30. Canna Lily

Selective focus of a yellow orange canna lily flower with green stem and leaves

Canna Lily – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Canna

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Canna Lily is a tall eye-catching, easy-to-grow tropical and subtropical plant that produces massive yellow flowers on top of its thick stalks with big green leaves. Most people love this flower because of the tropical feel they bring to gardens.

I recommend planting Canna Lily in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade. These heat-loving plants require regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist.

Fertilizing with a balanced fertilizer during the growing season promotes robust growth and abundant blooms. In colder climates, lifting and storing the rhizomes during winter is necessary.

Canna Lilies create a bold and exotic statement in gardens, adding height and tropical flair to the landscape.

31. Jessamine

 Blooming yellow flowers of Jessamine in its brown stem with green leaves

Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Gelsemium sempervirens

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 9 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

The yellow Jessamine plant is an early-blooming vine with bright funnel-like flowers. This perennial plant grows beautifully on trellises, walls, and over fences.

I recommend planting Jessamine in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade. Regular watering is necessary to keep the soil evenly moist, especially during dry periods. Providing support, such as a trellis or arbor, helps the vine climb and enhances its ornamental value.

Jessamine is a popular choice for arbors, fences, or pergolas, creating a romantic and aromatic ambiance in outdoor spaces.

32. Bulbous Buttercup

Macro of a blooming yellow flower of a bulbous buttercup

Bulbous Buttercup (Ranunculus bulbosus) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Ranunculus bulbosus

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial-full sun

Bulbous Buttercup is a charming perennial flower with bright yellow blooms that appear in spring. This perennial herb has a corn-like stem base and, most of the time, is recognized due to its buttery color.

The bulbous buttercup is a springtime flower that produced upward-turned flowers through March and May. I recommend planting Bulbous Buttercup in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade.

These plants prefer cooler temperatures and require regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and allowing the foliage to die back naturally after flowering helps the bulb store energy for the next season.

Bulbous Buttercup adds a splash of color to borders, rock gardens, or naturalized areas, creating a vibrant and cheerful display.

33. Bulbine

Selective focus of the yellow star-shaped flowers of bulbine in a field

Bulbine (Bulbine frutescens) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Bulbine frutescens

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Bulbine is a resilient succulent plant that produces clusters of star-shaped yellow flowers, adding a touch of brightness to drought-tolerant gardens.

This perennial succulent with grass-like foliage features yellow or orange blooms (depending on the variety), and its stalks can grow up to 2 feet and tend to grow in clumps.

As an experienced gardener, I suggest planting Bulbine in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure.

These plants are drought-tolerant and require minimal watering once established. Deadheading spent flowers maintains a tidy appearance and encourages continuous blooming.

Bulbine’s succulent foliage and vibrant flowers make it an excellent choice for rock gardens, dry slopes, or container plantings in arid regions.

34. Ranunculus

Selective focus of a yellow Bidens flower with its leaves in the background

Bidens – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Ranunculus

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Ranunculus is a stunning flower known for its vibrant and ruffled petals, including varieties in shades of yellow. It’s a perennial plant that grows on long stems and comes in bright colors.

This plant is a perfect-cut flower due to its long vase life and many blooms. I recommend planting Ranunculus in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade.

Regular watering is necessary to keep the soil evenly moist, but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. Ranunculus is often grown from corms and can be treated as an annual or lifted and stored in colder climates.

With their captivating blooms and intricate texture, Ranunculus flowers make a striking addition to garden beds, borders, or cut flower arrangements.

35. Bidens

Selective focus of a yellow Bidens flower with its leaves in the background

Bidens – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Bidens

Hardiness Zones: 8 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual (perennial in over 40ºF)

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Bidens is a cheerful annual flower that adds a burst of color to the garden. This star-shaped plant has daisy-like flowers that have a deep yellow color.

Biden’s centers are orange, which offers a beautiful contrast while maintaining its entirely yellow color appearance. I recommend planting Bidens in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure. These plants are heat-tolerant and require regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist.

Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and occasional trimming helps maintain a compact and bushy shape. Bidens is an excellent choice for borders, containers, or hanging baskets, creating a vibrant and cascading display.

36. Begonia

Blooming yellow begonia flowers with green leaves

Begonia – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Begonia

Hardiness Zones: 6 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Begonia is a perennial plant that comes in various varieties, but most have large double flowers in yellow, pink, orange, red, and white.

This flower blooms on top of dark green leaves. I recommend planting Begonias in well-drained soil and providing them with partial shade or filtered sunlight.

These plants prefer regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and occasional pinching back of the stems encourages bushier growth.

Begonias are popular for their beautiful flowers and attractive foliage, making them suitable for beds, borders, or containers.

37. Geranium

Selective focus of the yellow geranium flowers with green leaves

Geranium – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Geranium

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

These perennial flowers produce an endless supply of itty bitty flowers ranging from white to yellow blooms.

Geraniums bloom throughout June to frost -depending on the location. I recommend planting them in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun to partial shade. These plants appreciate regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist but allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings to prevent root diseases.

Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and pruning back the stems in late summer rejuvenates the plant. Geraniums are versatile and can be used in beds, borders, containers, or hanging baskets, bringing beauty and vibrancy to any garden.

38. Lilium

Selective focus of a yellow lilium flower with orange shades in its petals on a garden

Lilium – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Lilium

Hardiness Zones: 4 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/partial shade

Lilies are among the most popular flowers for floral arrangements thanks to their pleasant fragrance and large, showy blooms that most appreciate. These flowers have six trumpet-shaped petals that stand on a long stem.

I recommend planting Lilium bulbs in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun to partial shade. These plants appreciate regular watering, especially during the growing season, but ensure the soil does not become waterlogged.

Mulching around the base of the plants helps conserve moisture and insulate the bulbs in colder regions. Plus, removing faded flowers and allowing the foliage to die back naturally after blooming allows the bulbs to store energy for the next season.

Lilies are perfect for borders, beds, or cutting gardens, adding elegance and fragrance to the landscape.

39. Freesia

Selective focus of yellow freesia flowers with green leaves

Freesia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Freesia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full-partial sun

Freesia is a fragrant and delicate perennial flower known for its beautiful and colorful blooms, including varieties in shades of yellow. These lovely plants have upward-turned yellow petals and can be almost any color (white, pink, red, lilac, yellow, purple, blue, etc.).

Freesia’s funnel-shaped flowers have six tepals that grow from their spare-leaved stem. I recommend planting Freesia bulbs in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun to partial shade.

These plants require regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but avoid overwatering to prevent bulb rot. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and allowing the foliage to wither naturally after blooming allows the bulbs to store energy.

Freesias are ideal for beds, borders, or containers, where their lovely fragrance can be enjoyed.

40. Gerbera Daisy

Macro of a blooming yellow Gerbera daisy

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gerbera jamesonii

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Gerbera daisies have bright and cheerful blooms that come in many different colors. These popular flower sizes can range from 2 to 5 inches in diameter.

I recommend planting Gerbera Daisies in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun to partial shade. These plants prefer regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot.

Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and occasional fertilization with a balanced fertilizer encourages healthy growth. Gerbera Daisies are excellent for beds, borders, or containers, where their bold blooms create a stunning visual impact.

41. Marigold

Closeup view of a yellow marigold flower with its green leaves on the background

Marigold – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Tagetes

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full sun

These annual plants’ popularity comes from their bright yellow blossoms and unique summer blooming ability. Marigolds have carnation-like flower heads with ruffled petals and require tons of sunshine.

I recommend planting Marigolds in well-drained soil and providing them with full sun exposure. These plants are relatively low-maintenance and can tolerate dry conditions, but regular watering promotes healthy growth and abundant blooms.

Deadheading spent flowers encourages continuous blooming, and pinch pruning helps maintain compact and bushy plants. Marigolds are versatile and can be used in beds, borders, or containers, adding color and charm to the garden.

42. Bird of Paradise

ellow orange flower of the bird of paradise plant in its bract with shades of blue and lavender

Bird of Paradise – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Strelitzia

Hardiness Zones: 10 – 12 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial or full sun

Commonly known as the bird of paradise, Strelitzia is one of the most popular tropical plants in the market, its yellowish orange flowers emerge from a thick petiole, and it has five stamens and a boat-like shaped flower bract.

As an experienced gardener, I suggest planting Bird of Paradise in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade. These plants require regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but allow the top inch of soil to dry out between waterings. Plus, fertilizing with a balanced fertilizer during the growing season promotes healthy growth and flowering.

Bird of Paradise is a showstopper in gardens or as a potted plant, creating a tropical and dramatic focal point.

43. Calendula

Closeup shot of a yellow calendula flower in a black background with two woods in each side

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Calendula officinalis

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun/Partial shade

Yellow calendula flowers, characterized by their vibrant, sun-kissed hue, embody a symbol of delight and hope within the realm of botanical aesthetics. These delightful blossoms, often referred to as “marigolds,” captivate onlookers with their cheerful demeanor and a striking resemblance to daisies. Their petals exude a radiant, golden brilliance that effortlessly uplifts gardens and landscapes, rendering them a favored choice for decorative landscaping.

Yet, beyond their aesthetic allure, calendula flowers possess a wealth of therapeutic attributes. For centuries, they have featured prominently in traditional medicinal practices due to their potent anti-inflammatory and skin-soothing properties. Whether gracing a garden bed or gracing a herbal remedy, the yellow calendula flower serves as a testament to nature’s innate ability to infuse vivid color and vitality into our surroundings and well-being.

44. Bear’s Ear

Bear’s ear with yellow flowers and green leaves growing in a mountain slope

Bear’s Ear (Primula auricula) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Primula auricula

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial sun or full shade

This evergreen perennial has bear-like ear shape leaves, hence why it gets its name. This flower is commonly found growing between rocks in central Europe’s mountain slopes.

I recommend planting Bear’s Ear in moist, well-drained soil and providing it with partial shade or filtered sunlight. These plants appreciate regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist, especially during hot and dry periods. Plus, mulching around the base of the plants helps conserve moisture and keep the roots cool.

Bear’s Ear is an excellent choice for shade gardens or waterside plantings, where its bold foliage and unique flowers create a striking visual impact.

45. Blanket Flower

Selective focus of a yellow orange blanket flower with green stem

Blanket Flower (Gaillardia x Grandiflora) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Gaillardia x Grandiflora

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

Better known as blanket flower, the Gaillardia x Grandiflora is a genus of flowering plants in the Asteraceae sunflower family. This plant is an excellent choice to introduce two-toned yellow flowers to your yard.

I recommend planting Blanket Flower in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure. These plants are drought-tolerant once established and require minimal watering. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming and prevents self-seeding.

Blanket Flower attracts butterflies and other pollinators to the garden, making it a delightful addition to wildlife-friendly landscapes or wildflower meadows.

46. Busy Lizzie

Yellow flower of busy lizzie with green leaves

Busy Lizzie (Impatiens walleriana) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Impatiens walleriana

Hardiness Zones: 10a – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun

Busy Lizzie, also known as Impatiens, is a popular annual flower that blooms in various colors, including shades of yellow. This flowering herbaceous plant is originally from central East Africa and can grow up to 2 feet tall.

Besides yellow, this flower comes in several shades of orange. I recommend planting Busy Lizzie in well-drained soil and providing it with partial shade or filtered sunlight.

These plants prefer regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. Deadheading spent flowers encourages continuous blooming, and occasional fertilization with a balanced fertilizer promotes healthy growth.

Busy Lizzies are great for adding color to beds, borders, or containers, brightening up shady areas of the garden.

47. Coneflower

Focus shot of a yellow coneflower with green center

Coneflower – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Echinacea

Hardiness Zones: 3 – 8 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full or partial sun

Coneflower, also known as Echinacea, is a native perennial flower that produces bold and daisy-like yellow blooms.

These herbaceous drought-tolerant plants are commonly used as herbal remedy as it boosts the immune system and combats common colds and flu. Many believe coneflowers can lessen sore throat, cough, and fever severity.

I recommend planting Coneflower in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun exposure. These plants are relatively drought-tolerant once established and require minimal watering. Plus, deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and leaving the seed heads in the winter provides food for birds.

Coneflower is a popular choice for wildlife gardens, pollinator-friendly landscapes, or naturalized areas, adding beauty and ecological value to the garden.

48. Calibrachoa

Closeup view of a yellow calibrachoa flower with green stem and leaves

Calibrachoa – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Calibrachoa

Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade

This flowering ornamental shrub is a relatively new species, and it produces yellow flowers among other flower colors like red and violet. Calibrocha is also known as the “million bells” since it has upside-down bells-looking flowers.

These plants appreciate regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist but avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. Deadheading spent flowers promotes continuous blooming, and occasional trimming helps maintain a compact and bushy habit.

Calibrachoa is perfect for hanging baskets, window boxes, or containers, where its colorful blooms create a cascading floral display.

49. Carolina Yellow Jasmine

Selective focus of a Carolina yellow jasmine flower with green leaves

Carolina Yellow Jasmine (Gelsemium sempervirens) – Photo Credit: Dreamstime.

Botanical Name: Gelsemium sempervirens

Hardiness Zones: 7 – 10 (USDA)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full sun

This beautiful bloom is South Carolina’s state flower, and it produces tiny yellow blooms that grow from its vine. Carolina Yellow Jasmines are mainly used as active ground cover as they create bushy growth.

I recommend planting Carolina Yellow Jasmine in well-drained soil and providing it with full sun to partial shade. These plants appreciate regular watering to keep the soil evenly moist but allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings. Pruning after flowering helps maintain a neat shape and encourages new growth.

Carolina Yellow Jasmine is an excellent choice for trellises, fences, or pergolas, where its fragrant flowers create a delightful sensory experience.

 

Other Flower Guides from Planet Natural:

32 Stunning Green Flowers for Your Garden (With Pictures)

37 Popular White Flowers for Home Gardeners with Pictures

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