Q & A

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  • in reply to: Organic control for wire weeds/ grass #13977

    lilypotter
    Member

    For organic gardening, vinegar can function as a handy natural weed killer. It's the acetic acid in vinegar that gives it the power to kill weeds. The higher the percentage of acetic acid in the vinegar, the better it will operate as a natural weed killer, technically speaking. Vinegar used for culinary purposes is relatively low (5%) in acetic acid, so repeated applications will be necessary when using it as a natural weed killer.

    in reply to: Sealing pruning cuts on roses #13974

    lilypotter
    Member

    Pruning rose bushes is intimidating to many gardeners, but actually very good for the plants. Becoming an accomplished rose pruner takes time and practice, but keep in mind that it is very hard to kill a rose with bad pruning. While there is a great deal of disagreement among rose experts regarding how and when to prune roses, it is generally agreed that most mistakes will grow out very quickly and it is better to make a good effort at pruning roses than to let them grow rampant.

    in reply to: Treating Powdery Mildew on Squash #13973

    lilypotter
    Member

    It's literally a mildew that, when the leaves dry (and the humidity lowers) turns into powder (hence…the white color). The bugs walk across it on their way to their garden party (sorry…couldn't resist)…and track it to the next plant. Most 'maters and peppers are resistant, but your herbs: especially the sage, might be the next on the "hit" list.

    How to get rid of it??
    Lots of different ways really, it just depends on how organic, concerned about your ground water and bees, you are…..versus….the ole attach the noxious poison in a bottle to your hose end, add water, and just hope it works…..that I hope (since you have added organic sail)…you aren't.

    There are lots of remedies:
    1: only water in the morning. This allows the plant leave to dry throughout the day, limiting the fungal production
    2: cut and remove any heavily affected leaves of the plant. i know they are pretty when they are full, but a squash plant with 4-5 healthy leaves will produce far more product than one that is dead from the fungus.
    3: dispose of those leaves as far away from your garden as possible. DO NOT COMPOST!
    4: Dry rub the remaining, healthy(ish) leaves with paper towls to remove the loose spores that can be caught in the wind or tracked to other plants by vagabond critters.
    5: Keep an eye on everything else too….and especially (although I didn't mention it before): get rid of the Japanese Beetles!! They are the absolute WORST for spreading this….

    Now…..There are some fungal control agents that are organic, (and the ones that aren't….but I don't use them so….)and of course both are available at the usual outposts: Lowes/Home Depot. Some people do this funky milk wash down thing, but…. Personally, I've always had the best luck when I subscribe to the clip it back, wipe it off, water at night, thin out your space to increase breeze methods….and I've even tried wiping the leaves down with oil if they weren't too far gone….I can't swear that the oil thing helped…but is sure didn't hurt.

    in reply to: HELP! Mint is taking over my garden. #13971

    lilypotter
    Member

    A much less expensive, organic method is to dissolve 2 cups of salt (table salt is fine) and a squirt of dishsoap into 1 gallon of white vinegar. Pour into a WELL MARKED spray bottle, and liberally douse the mint, or any other green thing you want to curl up & die
    This is going to take MANY applications, because mint is the demon spawn of all garden plants, and is truly evil. But diligence will eventually win!

    in reply to: Organic Mix for Starting Seeds #13969

    lilypotter
    Member

    1) Clear a work area outside where you will not be concerned about making a mess. Use a drop cloth or newspapers if working inside.
    2) Gather your gardening supplies such as gloves and pots. You will also need a large container to mix and possibly store the organic potting soil.
    3) Collect your organic potting soil ingredients. This should include coco fiber, expanded shale, organic compost or earthworm castings, and wheat bran.
    4) Place equal parts of the organic potting soil ingredients into the container.
    5) Mix these supplies together by hand until they are distributed evenly.
    6) Use this mixture for potted plants, gardens and growing herbs. It can also be mixed in with the native soil in your organic flower beds.

    in reply to: Forcing Hyacinths to Bloom #13967

    lilypotter
    Member

    I have heard about water hyacinth. Are both one and the same. the one that grows in pots is also suitable to grow in water as Silver Vine?

    in reply to: Japanese Beetles on Strawberries #13966

    lilypotter
    Member

    Milky Spore powder is an amazing product developed for gardeners. Organic and natural, Milky Spore kills off Japanese beetle grubs that damage the lawn by: (a) chewing on grass roots and (b) attracting moles who love to eat those grubs.

    in reply to: Need help transplanting a rose #13965

    lilypotter
    Member

    First thing you need to think of is to plant the rose bush in good soil, and provide a location with good sun light, and ample air circulation. Secondly the right soil mix is important. Mix one-third good quality commercial potting soil, one-third hearty garden compost and one-third composted mushroom or steer manure. It is beneficial to the rose to add one cup of bonemeal to the soil. I also suggest adding 1 cup of fishmeal, and a cup blood meal. This soil combination, will assure you roses that will produce many hearty blooms over the growing season.