Q & A

Welcome to the Planet Natural Garden Forum! Whether you’re new to gardening or have been at it for some time, here you can search existing messages for answers to your questions or post a new message for others to reply to. If this is your first visit, please read over our forum instructions carefully before posting. Enjoy!

Forum Replies Created

  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: How do I kill aphids, but not lacewings? #287908

    Maxen
    Member

    Try using these methods:
    *Try spraying cold water on the leaves; sometimes all aphids need is a cool blast to dislodge them. Typically they are unable to find their way back to the same plant.
    *If you have a large aphid invasion, dust plants with flour. It constipates the pests.
    *Neem oil, insecticidal soaps, and horticultural oils are effective against aphids. Be sure to follow the application instructions provided on the packaging.
    *You can often get rid of aphids by wiping or spraying the leaves of the plant with a mild solution of water and a few drops of dish soap. Soapy water should be reapplied every 2-3 days for 2 weeks.
    *One variation of this soap-water mix includes cayenne pepper: Stir together 1-quart water, 1 tsp liquid dish soap, and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Do not dilute before spraying on plants.
    Cheers!

    in reply to: How do I stop roly poly bugs from eating my plants? #287907

    Maxen
    Member

    *Reduce moisture or humidity level indoors. Use bathroom fans, stove hood vent fans, vent clothes dryers outside. Crawl spaces and attics need to be well ventilated.
    *Remove excess vegetation and debris around the exterior perimeter of the home. Make sure that leaf debris (leaves hold moisture and hide the bugs) is cleaned up from around the outside of your house. Keep rain gutters and downspouts clean and in good repair.
    *Instead of chemicals, use a caulking gun to close any cracks or crevices at or near ground level. Houses built on a concrete slab poured directly on the ground, can have more of a problem with sow bugs or pill bugs if there is no moisture barrier under the concrete.
    *Built-in planters are usually a bad idea for many reasons. Window box planters and planter boxes on decks tight against the house are good breeding places for many bugs.
    *Make sure all your doors (ground level, to the outside) are weather-stripped. If your garage is attached or integral to the house, make sure those doors are properly weather-stripped also.
    *Watch for obvious moisture problems in the garage and bottom level.
    *Keep soil levels well below structural wood around the home.
    Hope this helps!

    in reply to: late season grasshopper control #285504

    Maxen
    Member

    Either uses an organic insecticide or use some trick method.

    in reply to: tobacco dust? #285503

    Maxen
    Member

    I wouldn’t ever consider using tobacco powder as an organic pesticide, as even though many people think that all organic fertilizers and pesticides are safe.


    Maxen
    Member

    Bugs don’t really bite, so another solution to the milkweed bug problem is to pull them off the plant and drop them into a bucket of soapy water or drop them to the ground and squish them with your foot.
    Cheers!

    in reply to: Do termites eat live trees? #285389

    Maxen
    Member

    1. Cut away infected wood as soon as signs of termites are discovered. Evidence may include narrow tunnels through the wood, larger nesting chambers, small white eggs or the termites themselves. Burn or otherwise destroy the wood as soon as possible to ensure that the termites do not spread from the infested material.

    2. Spray liquid termiticide in a 3-foot radius around the base of the infected tree and any other nearby trees that may be close enough for their canopies to touch. Spray the tree trunk itself up to a height of two feet. This will deter any further termites from approaching the tree. As a greener alternative to commercial hydrocarbon-based termiticides, use a biodegradable permethrin-based insecticide, such as Torpedo or Dragnet.

    3. Set termite traps around the area to alert you to any new termite activity. Simple wooden-stake traps, available at hardware stores or home improvement retailers, can be driven into the ground and left as bait for roving termites, then pulled up and checked regularly. These chemical-free traps are made of pine and pose no environmental or safety hazards to pets or children.

    4. Monitor the infested tree carefully and repeat the spray treatment if any additional evidence of termites appears. Prevent new infestations by removing old wood piles, rotting stumps or any other potential sites for termite colonies.

    You can contact professional pest control – theeliminator.com.au

    in reply to: Sunflowers on north side of garden #285387

    Maxen
    Member

    The longer side of soil are the right place to plant sunflowers.

    in reply to: Is there a raspberry safe herbicide? #284621

    Maxen
    Member

    Raspberries and other caneberries are prized for the large number of flavorful fruits they can produce. A number of factors can negatively impact raspberry yield and fruit quality, including moisture stress; inadequate or excessive nutrients; pests or diseases; and weeds that compete with the raspberry canes for water, nutrients, and light. Weeds near plantings can also harbor potential raspberry pests and diseases. Clearing an area of weeds and weed seeds prior to establishing a raspberry planting can reduce the presence of weeds for several years, but weed control around established canes is still eventually necessary. Here are the steps,

    1. Pull small weeds up by hand, or shallowly cultivate the area with a hoe or similar implement. Break up no more than the top 2 to 3 inches of soil, and leave ample space around the canes to avoid accidentally injuring the canes or roots.

    2.Spread 3 to 8 inches of an organic material mulch like dry grass clippings, shredded leaves or straw between the rows and plants. The thickness of the mulch layer should vary depending on the material. For example, a 6- to 8-inch layer of straw is needed to effectively block weeds, while 3 inches of sawdust may perform equally well.

    3. Spray a non-selective herbicide such as glyphosate only on the weeds, taking care to avoid contact with or drift onto raspberry canes or any other desirable vegetation. Alternatively, you can apply a herbicide that contains paraquat or carfentrazone to the entire mature raspberry stand to control weeds and green, first-year canes.

    4. Mow, trim, pull or use a non-selective herbicide such as glyphosate to address weeds near the raspberry planting or garden before they go to seed or, in the case of creeping perennial weeds, grow into the planting.

    in reply to: Why are the edges of my plant leaves turning brown? #284616

    Maxen
    Member

    When a plant gets brown edges on leaves or brown leaf tips, a gardener’s first thought may be that this is a disease or pest that is attacking the plant. This is not always the case. When there are whole brown leaves on a plant, this can indicate several dozen problems; but when just the sides or tips of the leaf turn brown, there is only one problem — the plant is stressed. Most commonly brown leaf tips or brown edges on leaves are caused by the plant not getting enough water. There are several reasons why this may happen.

    1. There may be too little natural water falling.
    2. The roots are constricted and unable to reach out for water.
    3. The soil does not hold onto the water.
    4. The roots may be damaged.

    Another reason for the sides of a leaf to turn brown is a high salt content in the soil. This can either be natural in the soil, such as from living close to the ocean, or this can happen through over fertilizing. If you live near a source of salt water, there will be very little you can do to correct the problem. If you suspect that you have over fertilized, reduce the amount of fertilizer and increase the amount of watering for a few weeks to help wash the salt away.

    in reply to: Can I raise my own bees? #283304

    Maxen
    Member

    Honeybees are typically purchased in one of two ways, a package, or a nuc. A package is generally three pounds of bees, with a separately caged queen, all in a screened box. The package bees must be moved into a hive. Hope this helps!

    in reply to: mice in house #282474

    Maxen
    Member

    You’ll need to seal off the entrances. That’s usually vents on the foundation and eaves and holes in the floors and walls. It is best to look for professionals help, or visit the eliminator company site for more information about rodents.

    in reply to: All-Natural Mosquito Control Methods #282472

    Maxen
    Member

    Hello Maggie, I have had to deal with mosquitoes for most of my life, and the most important thing I have found is to avoid any standing water. Water is tires is especially bad because the water can breed mosquitoes in a dark covered environments for weeks. I would complain to the city, as it is a health hazard.

    in reply to: non-toxic mosquito control #282471

    Maxen
    Member

    In my case, I use a mixture of baby oil, detol and a few drops of tee tree oil, keeps the pesky buggers away.

    in reply to: What pet-safe spray kills fleas & ticks? #282468

    Maxen
    Member

    Good read on ticks, I always recommend permethrin for spraying around yards and in kennels. Once it is dry it is safe for the pet.

    in reply to: How can I get rid of wireworms in my garden? #282465

    Maxen
    Member

    You can cut a potato in half stick and small stick through it, and bury it in the place where you last saw them for about an inch. Have caught some this way, but I am nematoding the area during winter.

    in reply to: Do termites eat plants? #282213

    Maxen
    Member

    There are different kinds of termites, I think the one that you are having trouble of was an agricultural termite. They are known to attack cellulose either on the roots of plants, or above ground. The agricultural termites prefer to eat decomposing grasses, but in times of drought, they will attack growing ground covers just like what Vinje mentioned above.

    in reply to: How do I get rid of whitefly on my indoor plants? #282212

    Maxen
    Member

    I like to use yellow sticky trap cards on my garden, I think it would work the same indoor.