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135 Popular Types of Flowers You Should Grow in Your Garden

Different types of flowers in various colors

Are you ready to transform your garden into a blooming paradise? Flowers have this magical ability to add vibrancy and charm to any space. So, let’s delve into the fascinating world of flora and explore 135 popular types of flowers that you can grow right in your garden.

Imagine stepping into your garden and being greeted by a riot of colors and fragrances. That dream can easily become a reality by choosing the right flowers to cultivate. From the elegant Roses to the cheerful Sunflowers, there’s a wide array of options to cater to every taste and climate. So, put on your gardening gloves, grab your shovel, and let’s explore the different types of flowers that you should grow in your garden.

  1. Table of Contents

    Rose (Rosa spp.)

Red rose (Rosa spp.) with green leaves in the garden

Rose – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Rosa spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Roses are classic garden flowers, known for their diverse colors and fragrances. They require well-drained soil and regular pruning. Roses are often used in floral arrangements and perfumes. The rose has been a symbol of beauty, love, and passion.

  1. Lily (Lilium spp.)

Pink Lilies (Lilium spp.) selective focus

Lily – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lilium spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Bulbous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Lilies come in various colors and are prized for their elegant, trumpet-shaped flowers. They prefer rich, moist soil and require protection from strong winds. Lilies are popular in bouquets and symbolize purity and renewal.

  1. Tulip (Tulipa spp.)

Colorful Tulips (Tulipa spp.) in the garden

Tulip – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Tulipa spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Bulbous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Tulips are known for their vibrant, cup-shaped flowers in diverse colors. They thrive in well-drained soil and require adequate water during their growing season.  Tulip bulbs should be planted in the fall, in areas where they can receive partial to full sun. Tulips are widely used for ornamental purposes and can be planted in clusters for a striking display.

  1. Daffodil (Narcissus spp.)

Yellow Daffodils (Narcissus spp.) selective focus in the garden

Daffodil – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Narcissus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Bulbous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Daffodils feature trumpet-shaped flowers with a central corona and surrounding petals. They are low-maintenance and naturalize well. Daffodils are commonly used in gardens and are deer-resistant.

  1. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

Selective focus of Common Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) blooming in the garden

Sunflower – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Helianthus annuus

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Sunflowers are tall, sturdy plants with large, yellow flower heads. They prefer full sun and well-drained soil. Sunflowers are not only beautiful but also produce edible seeds. They are popular as cut flowers and attract birds and bees to the garden.

  1. Lavender (Lavandula spp.)

Field of Lavender (Lavandula spp.)

Lavender – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lavandula spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Shrub/Herbaceous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Lavender is known for its fragrant, slender spikes of blue or purple flowers. It thrives in sunny locations and well-drained soil. Lavender is widely used in aromatherapy, culinary dishes, and sachets. It also attracts pollinators.

  1. Marigold (Tagetes spp.)

Yellow-orange Marigold (Tagetes spp.) flowers

Marigold – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Tagetes spp.

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Marigolds have golden, orange, or yellow flowers with a strong, distinctive scent. They are easy to grow and are often used as border plants. Marigolds repel pests and are used in companion planting to protect other garden plants.

  1. Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum spp.)

Red orange Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum spp.) flowers blooming in the garden

Chrysanthemum – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Chrysanthemum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Chrysanthemums, or mums, have a wide variety of flower forms and colors. They bloom in late summer and fall, adding color to the garden when most other plants are fading. Mums are popular in floral arrangements and symbolize longevity and fidelity.

  1. Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)

Selective focus of pink kisses carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)

Carnation – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Carnations have frilly, often fragrant flowers in various colors. They prefer well-drained soil and benefit from deadheading to encourage more blooms. A pink carnation symbolizes motherly love, a white carnation means good luck, whereas a yellow carnation means disappointment. Carnations are popular in bouquets, corsages, and boutonnieres.

  1. Orchid (Orchidaceae family)

Pink Orchids on the windowsill

Orchid – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Orchidaceae family

Hardiness Zones: Varies based on species

Plant Type: Epiphytic/Terrestrial Perennial

Sun Exposure: Indirect Sunlight

Orchids are exotic and diverse, with intricate flowers in various shapes and colors. They require specific care, including proper humidity and light levels. Orchids are highly prized as ornamental houseplants and are symbols of rare beauty and elegance.

  1. Dahlia (Dahlia spp.)

Colorful Dahlia flowers

Dahlia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dahlia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 7-11

Plant Type: Tuberous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Dahlias are known for their vibrant, multi-layered blooms in various colors and sizes. They thrive in well-drained soil and require regular watering. Dahlia flowers are excellent cut flowers and add a splash of color to gardens and floral arrangements.

  1. Hydrangea (Hydrangea spp.)

Colorful Hydrangea flowers in shades of pink, blue, and purple

Hydrangea – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Hydrangea spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Flowering Shrub

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade

Hydrangeas boast large, showy clusters of flowers in pink, blue, white, or purple hues. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and benefit from regular pruning. Hydrangeas are popular flowering shrubs in landscaping and can be dried for decorative purposes.

  1. Peony (Paeonia spp.)

Pink Peony (Paeonia spp.) flowers

Peony – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Paeonia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Herbaceous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Peonies have large, lush blooms during late spring to early summer and have various colors, including shades of pink, red, and white. They require well-drained soil and appreciate support for their heavy flowers. Peonies are classic garden plants, symbolizing romance and prosperity.

  1. Poppy (Papaver spp.)

Close up of a red poppy (Papaver spp.) flower

Poppy – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Papaver spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Poppies are delicate, papery flowers in shades of red, orange, pink, or white. They prefer well-drained soil and self-seed readily. Poppies are used in floral arrangements and are also a source of poppy seeds.

  1. Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.)

Selective focus of a red Hibiscus flower

Hibiscus – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Hibiscus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-11 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Hibiscus plants feature large, showy flowers in various colors, often with a prominent central stamen. They require moist soil and benefit from regular pruning. Hibiscus flowers are edible and used in herbal teas. They are also symbolic in many cultures.

  1. Crocus (Crocus spp.)

Colorful crocus flower field

Crocus – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Crocus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Bulbous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Crocuses are small, early-blooming flowers in shades of purple, yellow, or white. They are one of the first signs of spring. Crocuses naturalize well and are often planted in lawns, rock gardens, or under trees.

  1. Iris (Iris spp.)

Purple iris flowers

Iris – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Iris spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Rhizomatous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Irises have striking, sword-shaped leaves and flowers in a wide range of colors. They require well-drained soil and benefit from dividing every few years. Irises are used in landscaping, borders, and are a popular choice for cut flowers.

  1. Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)

Purple Foxglove flowers selective focus

Foxglove – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Digitalis purpurea

Hardiness Zones: 4-8

Plant Type: Biennial/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Foxgloves have tall spikes of tubular flowers in shades of pink, purple, or white. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and partial shade. Foxgloves are poisonous if ingested and are used in traditional medicine for heart conditions.

  1. Zinnia (Zinnia spp.)

Colorful Zinnia (Zinnia spp.) flowers in yellow, pink, orange, yellow, and red shades

Zinnia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Zinnia Genus

Hardiness Zones: 3-10

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Zinnias are colorful, daisy-like flowers in various shapes and sizes. They are easy to grow from seeds and prefer well-drained soil. Zinnias are excellent for attracting butterflies to the garden and are often used in borders and containers.

  1. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus)

Selective focus of a white Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) in the field

Snapdragon – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Antirrhinum majus

Hardiness Zones: 4-10

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Snapdragons have spiky clusters of flowers that resemble dragon heads. They come in various colors and heights. Snapdragons prefer cool weather and well-drained soil. They are popular in floral arrangements and add vertical interest to gardens.

  1. Begonia (Begonia spp.)

Fuchsia colored Begonia on a black pot

Begonia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Begonia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 10-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Begonias are prized for their vibrant, showy flowers and attractive foliage. They thrive in shaded areas and well-drained, moist soil. Begonias are popular for hanging baskets, containers, and indoor gardens due to their colorful blooms and unique leaf shapes.

  1. Daisy (Bellis perennis)

Daisy (Bellis perennis) flowers blooming in the garden

Daisy (Bellis perennis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Bellis perennis

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Daisies are simple yet charming perennial flowers with white petals and yellow centers. They tolerate a variety of soil conditions and are low-maintenance. Daisies are excellent ground covers and are often associated with innocence and purity. Native to Europe and western Asia, daisies were used in traditional medicine to treat ailments such as coughs, digestive problems, and skin conditions.

  1. Morning Glory (Ipomoea spp.)

Blue Morning Glory (Ipomoea spp.) flower blooming

Morning Glory – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Ipomoea spp.

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Morning Glories are fast-growing vines with vibrant, funnel-shaped flowers in shades of blue, purple, pink, or white. They prefer well-drained soil and support structures for climbing. Morning Glories are perfect for covering fences, trellises, or arbors.

  1. Aster (Aster spp.)

Purple Alpine Aster blooming in the garden

Aster – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Aster spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Asters bloom in late summer and early fall, producing daisy-like flowers in various colors, including shades of purple, pink, and white. They require well-drained soil and regular deadheading for prolonged blooming. Asters are attractive to butterflies and bees.

  1. Delphinium (Delphinium spp.)

Delphinium flowers in shades of white, purple, and blue

Delphinium – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Delphinium spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-7

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Delphiniums are tall, stately plants with spikes of densely packed, spurred flowers in shades of blue, pink, purple, or white. They need rich, well-drained soil and staking to support their height. Delphiniums are excellent as cut flowers and add vertical interest to gardens.

  1. Clematis (Clematis spp.)

Pink Clematis flowers with green leaves

Clematis – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Clematis spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-11 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Vine

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Clematis vines produce large, colorful flowers in various shapes, including single, double, or bell-shaped blooms. They require well-drained soil and support structures for climbing. Clematis is a versatile plant, suitable for trellises, fences, or container gardening.

  1. Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus)

Orange Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) flowers with green leaves

Nasturtium – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Tropaeolum majus

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (usually grown as annuals)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Nasturtiums feature round, vibrant flowers in shades of red, orange, yellow, or cream. Both flowers and leaves are edible, with a slightly peppery taste, making them popular in salads. Nasturtiums are easy to grow and add a splash of color to gardens and hanging baskets.

  1. Ranunculus (Ranunculus spp.)

Field of Ranunculus flowers in shades of pink, orange, white, magenta, and yellow

Ranunculus – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Ranunculus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 8-10 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Ranunculus plants produce stunning, rose-like flowers in various colors, including red, pink, yellow, and white. They prefer well-drained soil and cool temperatures. Ranunculus blooms are popular in floral arrangements and add elegance to gardens.

  1. Gaillardia (Gaillardia spp.)

Closeup shot of Gaillardia flower

Gaillardia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gaillardia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-10 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Gaillardia, also known as blanket flowers, have vibrant, daisy-like blooms in shades of red, orange, and yellow. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in well-drained soil. Gaillardia flowers attract butterflies and are excellent for adding a splash of color to sunny borders.

  1. Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)

Colorful Gladiolus flowersColorful Gladiolus flowers

Gladiolus – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gladiolus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 7-10 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Cormous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Gladiolus plants produce tall spikes of vibrant, sword-shaped flowers in various colors. They require well-drained soil and regular watering. Gladiolus flowers are popular in floral arrangements and symbolize strength and integrity.

  1. Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis)

Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis) flowers selective focus

Bleeding Heart – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dicentra spectabilis

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Herbaceous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Bleeding Heart plants feature distinct, heart-shaped flowers that dangle gracefully from arching stems. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and shade. Bleeding Hearts are perfect for woodland gardens and shaded borders, adding a touch of romance and elegance.

  1. Columbine (Aquilegia spp.)

Red Columbine (Aquilegia spp.) flowers selective focus in the garden

Columbine – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Aquilegia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Columbines have unique, spurred flowers in various colors, including blue, pink, yellow, and white. They prefer well-drained soil and are attractive to hummingbirds. Columbines are ideal for cottage gardens and rockeries, providing a delightful, whimsical appearance.

  1. Coreopsis (Coreopsis spp.)

Blooming yellow flowers of Coreopsis

Coreopsis – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Coreopsis spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Coreopsis plants produce daisy-like flowers in shades of yellow, orange, and pink. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in well-drained soil. Coreopsis flowers are excellent for attracting butterflies and bees, making them a valuable addition to pollinator gardens.

  1. Liatris (Liatris spp.)

Purple Liatris spikes

Liatris – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Liatris spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Liatris, also known as blazing star or gayfeather, have tall spikes of fluffy, purple or white flowers. They prefer well-drained soil and are attractive to butterflies and bees. Liatris plants add vertical interest to gardens and are drought-tolerant once established.

  1. Phlox (Phlox spp.)

Blooming white Phlox flowers in the garden

Phlox – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Phlox spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Phlox plants offer clusters of fragrant flowers in shades of pink, purple, or white. They require well-drained soil and regular watering. Phlox flowers are excellent for borders and rock gardens, providing vibrant colors and a pleasant aroma.

  1. Oxeye Daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare)

Oxeye Daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) flowers blooming in the garden

Oxeye Daisy – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Leucanthemum vulgare

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Oxeye Daisies have white, daisy-like flowers with yellow centers. They are adaptable and can thrive in various soil conditions. Oxeye Daisies are excellent for naturalizing landscapes and meadows, attracting pollinators and adding a touch of simplicity and charm.

  1. Balloon Flower (Platycodon grandiflorus)

Closeup shot of purple Balloon Flowers (Platycodon grandiflorus)

Balloon Flower – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Platycodon grandiflorus

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Balloon Flowers have balloon-like buds that open into star-shaped, blue, pink, or white flowers. They prefer well-drained soil and regular watering. Balloon Flowers are perfect for borders and containers, providing long-lasting blooms and a unique, playful appearance.

  1. Bee Balm (Monarda spp.)

Closeup shot of a pink Bee Balm (Monarda spp.) flower with a bee

Bee Balm – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Monarda spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Bee Balm plants produce clusters of tubular flowers in shades of red, pink, or purple. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and are attractive to bees and butterflies. Bee Balm is used in herbal teas and adds a pop of color to garden borders and cottage gardens.

  1. Blanketflower (Gaillardia pinnatifida)

Indian Blanketflowers (Gaillardia pinnatifida) in the garden

Blanketflower – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gaillardia pinnatifida

Hardiness Zones: 3-10

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Blanketflowers have yellow to red daisy-like flowers with a central disk. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in well-drained soil. Blanketflowers are excellent for xeriscaping and wildflower gardens, providing vibrant colors and attracting pollinators.

  1. Canna Lily (Canna indica)

Closeup shot of the red flowers of Canna Lily (Canna indica)

Canna Lily – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Canna indica

Hardiness Zones: 7-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Canna Lilies have bold, tropical-looking leaves and vibrant, lily-like flowers in red, orange, yellow, or pink shades. They require well-drained soil and regular watering. Canna Lilies are ideal for adding a touch of exotic beauty to gardens and containers.

  1. Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Field filled with Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) flowers with yellow petals and black center

Black-Eyed Susan – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Rudbeckia hirta

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Black-Eyed Susans feature bright yellow or orange petals with dark centers. They are hardy, drought-tolerant plants that thrive in various soil conditions. Black-Eyed Susans are excellent for wildflower gardens and attract bees and butterflies.

  1. Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Garden with orange Calendula (Calendula officinalis) flowers

Calendula – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Calendula officinalis

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (often grown as annuals)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Calendula, also known as pot marigold, has bright orange or yellow flowers. They are edible and used in salads, soups, and teas. Calendula plants prefer well-drained soil and add a pop of color to herb gardens and containers.

  1. Dianthus (Dianthus spp.)

Blooming red and pink dianthus flowers

Dianthus – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dianthus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Dianthus, or pinks, have fragrant, fringed flowers in various colors, including pink, red, and white. They require well-drained soil and benefit from deadheading to encourage more blooms. Dianthus are excellent for borders, rock gardens, and cut flower arrangements.

  1. Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea)

Blooming purple coneflowers or Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea)

Echinacea – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Echinacea purpurea

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Echinacea, or coneflowers, have large, daisy-like flowers with prominent cones in the center. They are drought-tolerant and attract pollinators. Echinacea plants are used in herbal medicine and provide a burst of color in late summer gardens.

  1. Hollyhock (Alcea rosea)

Hollyhock (Alcea rosea) flowers in red and pink shades with green leaves

Hollyhock (Alcea rosea) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Alcea rosea

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Biennial/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Hollyhocks have tall spikes of large, colorful flowers in shades of pink, red, yellow, or white. They require well-drained soil and may need staking to support their height. Hollyhocks add a cottage-garden charm and are perfect for back borders and cottage-style gardens.

  1. Primrose (Primula spp.)

Primrose (Primula spp.) flower with red petals and a yellow center on a white pot

Primrose (Primula spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Primula spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Primroses have clusters of fragrant, often multicolored flowers in shades of pink, purple, yellow, or white. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and partial shade. Primroses are ideal for woodland gardens and early spring displays.

  1. Salvia (Salvia spp.)

Salvia red tubular flowers with green foliage

Salvia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Salvia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-11 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Salvias have spikes of tubular flowers in various colors, including blue, red, pink, or purple. They are drought-tolerant and attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Salvias are excellent for borders, rock gardens, and Mediterranean-style gardens.

  1. Verbena (Verbena spp.)

Selective focus of purple Verbena flowers

Verbena – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Verbena spp.

Hardiness Zones: 7-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Verbenas have clusters of small, colorful flowers in shades of purple, pink, red, or white. They are heat-tolerant and bloom profusely throughout the summer. Verbenas are perfect for cascading over containers and hanging baskets.

  1. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

White Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) flowers in the field

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Achillea millefolium

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Yarrow plants have flat-topped clusters of tiny, aromatic flowers in shades of white, yellow, pink, or red. They are drought-tolerant and attract butterflies. Yarrow is used in herbal medicine and adds a natural, wildflower look to gardens.

  1. Zantedeschia (Zantedeschia spp.)

Closeup shot of white Zantedeschia (Zantedeschia spp.) inflorescence and spathe

Zantedeschia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Zantedeschia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 8-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Zantedeschias, also known as calla lilies, have elegant, trumpet-shaped flowers in shades of white, pink, yellow, or purple. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and are popular in bouquets and floral arrangements. Calla lilies are often associated with sympathy and rebirth.

  1. Freesia (Freesia spp.)

White Freesia flowers in the garden

Freesia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Freesia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Cormous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Freesias have fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers in a wide range of colors, including white, yellow, pink, and purple. They prefer well-drained soil and bloom in spring. Freesias are popular in cut flower arrangements and add a delightful scent to gardens.

  1. Gardenia (Gardenia spp.)

    Closeup shot of a white Gardenia flower with green foliage

    Gardenia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gardenia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 8-11 (often grown as houseplants in colder zones)

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade

Gardenias have waxy, white flowers with a strong, sweet fragrance. They require acidic, well-drained soil and consistent moisture. Gardenias are often used in corsages and bouquets and are prized for their elegant appearance and delightful scent.

  1. Coral Bells (Heuchera spp.)

Purple Coral Bells (Heuchera spp.) with purple flowers and leaves

Coral Bells (Heuchera spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Heuchera spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Heucheras, also known as coral bells, have delicate, bell-shaped flowers on tall stalks. They are prized for their colorful foliage, which comes in shades of green, purple, and silver. Heucheras are excellent for borders and add texture and interest to the garden.

  1. Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis)

Closeup shot of pink Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis) flowers

Japanese Anemone (Anemone hupehensis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Anemone hupehensis

Hardiness Zones: 4-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Japanese Anemones have large, saucer-shaped flowers in shades of pink or white. They prefer well-drained soil and bloom in late summer and fall. Japanese Anemones are ideal for woodland gardens and shady borders, adding a touch of elegance.

  1. Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe spp.)

Kalanchoe flowers in a pot in the garden with shades of pink, yellow, red, and peach

Kalanchoe – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Kalanchoe spp.

Hardiness Zones: 10-12 (often grown as houseplants in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Kalanchoes have clusters of small, vibrant flowers in shades of orange, yellow, pink, or red. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in well-drained soil. Kalanchoes are often grown in containers and are famous for their long-lasting blooms.

  1. Lobelia (Lobelia spp.)

Blue Lobelia flowers

Lobelia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lobelia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 2-10 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Lobelias have delicate, tubular flowers in shades of blue, purple, pink, or white. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and are attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies. Lobelias are perfect for hanging baskets, borders, and containers.

  1. Monkshood (Aconitum spp.)

Closeup shot of violet Monkshood (Aconitum spp.) flowers

Monkshood (Aconitum spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Aconitum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-7

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Monkshoods have tall spikes of hooded, helmet-shaped flowers in shades of blue, purple, or white. They require rich, moist soil and are highly toxic if ingested. Monkshoods add height and a mysterious allure to shaded gardens.

  1. Osteospermum (Osteospermum spp.)

Blooming purple Osteospermum flowers with green foliage on a sunny garden

Osteospermum – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Osteospermum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Osteospermums, also known as African daisies, have daisy-like flowers in shades of purple, pink, orange, or white. They prefer well-drained soil and bloom profusely in the sun. Osteospermums are perfect for rock gardens and containers.

  1. Pansy (Viola tricolorvar. hortensis)

Colorful Pansy (Viola tricolor var. hortensis) flowers with shades of yellow, purple, and blue

Pansy (Viola tricolor var. hortensis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Viola tricolor var. hortensis

Hardiness Zones: 6-10 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Pansies have colorful, flat-faced flowers in various shades, including blue, purple, yellow, and white. They tolerate cool temperatures and bloom in spring and fall. Pansies are excellent for borders, containers, and adding a pop of color to winter gardens.

  1. Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)

White flowerhead of Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota)

Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Daucus carota

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Biennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Queen Anne’s Lace, also known as wild carrot, has lacy, white flower heads with a central purple or dark flower. They grow in a flat-topped umbrella shape. Queen Anne’s Lace is perfect for naturalized landscapes and adds a touch of wild beauty to gardens

  1. Sedum (Sedum spp.)

Pink Sedum flower clusters with green foliage

Sedum – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Sedum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Sedums, or stonecrops, have fleshy leaves and produce clusters of star-shaped flowers in shades of pink, red, or yellow. They are drought-tolerant and low-maintenance, making them ideal for rock gardens and ground covers.

  1. Umbrella Plant (Cyperus alternifolius)

Closeup shot of the green foliage of an Umbrella Plant (Cyperus alternifolius)

Umbrella Plant (Cyperus alternifolius) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Cyperus alternifolius

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (often grown as houseplants in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade

Umbrella plants have umbrella-shaped clusters of long, slender leaves. They thrive in wet, marshy soil and are often grown near ponds or water features. Umbrella plants add a tropical touch to indoor and outdoor gardens.

  1. Verbascum (Verbascum spp.)

Macro of yellow Verbascum flowers

Verbascum – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Verbascum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Verbascums, also known as mulleins, produce tall spikes of flowers in shades of yellow, pink, or purple. They prefer well-drained soil and are drought-tolerant once established. Verbascums are excellent for adding height to borders and cottage gardens.

  1. Wisteria (Wisteria spp.)

Purple Wisteria flowers hanging

Wisteria – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Wisteria spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Vine

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Wisterias have cascading clusters of fragrant, pea-like flowers in shades of purple, blue, or white. They require sturdy support structures and well-drained soil. Wisterias create stunning displays on pergolas, arbors, and fences.

  1. Xeranthemum (Xeranthemum annuum)

White and purple Xeranthemum (Xeranthemum annuum) flowers

Xeranthemum (Xeranthemum annuum) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Xeranthemum annuum

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (often grown as annuals)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Xeranthemums, also known as everlasting flowers, have papery, globe-shaped flowers in shades of purple, pink, or white. They are drought-tolerant and maintain their color and shape even after drying, making them popular for dried flower arrangements.

  1. Yucca (Yucca spp.)

Selective focus on the green foliage of Yucca

Yucca – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Yucca spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-11 (depending on species)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Yuccas have spiky leaves and produce tall panicles of bell-shaped flowers in white or cream. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in well-drained soil. Yuccas add a touch of architectural interest to gardens and are suitable for xeriscaping.

  1. ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia)

ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia) with green foliage on a white pot

ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Zamioculcas zamiifolia

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (often grown as houseplants in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Low Light to Bright, Indirect Light

ZZ plants have glossy, dark green leaves and are highly tolerant of low light conditions. They require infrequent watering, making them popular indoor plants. ZZ plants add a touch of elegance and greenery to homes and offices.

  1. Alstroemeria (Alstroemeria spp.)

Alstroemeria flowers in shades of yellow, purple, pink, red, and white

Alstroemeria – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Alstroemeria spp.

Hardiness Zones: 6-10

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Alstroemerias, also known as Peruvian lilies, feature vibrant, trumpet-shaped flowers in various colors, including orange, pink, and yellow. They are long-lasting cut flowers and symbolize friendship and mutual support.

  1. Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera)

Close-up shot of Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera) flowers

Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Ophrys apifera

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Bee Orchids have unique, bee-shaped flowers with intricate patterns and colors resembling bees. They are native to Europe and are fascinating additions to wildflower meadows and naturalized gardens.

  1. Chocolate Cosmos (Cosmos atrosanguineus)

Deep maroon flowers of Chocolate Cosmos (Cosmos atrosanguineus)

Chocolate Cosmos (Cosmos atrosanguineus) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Cosmos atrosanguineus

Hardiness Zones: 7-11

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Chocolate Cosmos feature deep maroon, velvety flowers with a rich chocolate scent. They are eye-catching and aromatic, making them popular for cut flower arrangements and fragrant gardens.

  1. Euphorbia (Euphorbia spp.)

White Euphorbia flowers with green foliage

Euphorbia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Euphorbia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Euphorbias, or spurge plants, have unique, often colorful bracts and tiny flowers. Some varieties, like Euphorbia characias, offer architectural interest with their spiky foliage. They are drought-tolerant and suitable for xeriscaping.

  1. Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.)

Fuchsia plant with pink and purple flowers and green foliage on a hanging pot

Fuchsia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Fuchsia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 6-10

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Fuchsias have pendulous, tubular flowers in shades of pink, purple, and red. They thrive in shaded areas and are popular choices for hanging baskets, adding a splash of color to shaded patios and balconies.

  1. Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens)

Violet Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens) flowers with green foliage

Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Heliotropium arborescens

Hardiness Zones: 10-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Heliotropes have clusters of small, fragrant flowers in shades of purple, blue, or white. They are beloved for their sweet vanilla scent and are perfect for borders and containers, enhancing gardens with their delightful fragrance.

  1. Jacob’s Ladder (Polemonium caeruleum)

Macro of the purple flowers of Jacob's Ladder (Polemonium caeruleum)

Jacob’s Ladder (Polemonium caeruleum) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Polemonium caeruleum

Hardiness Zones: 3-7

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Jacob’s Ladder has delicate, fern-like foliage and clusters of blue, bell-shaped flowers. They thrive in shaded areas and are perfect for woodland gardens, adding a soft, ethereal charm.

  1. Kangaroo Paw (Anigozanthos spp.)

Selective focus on the Kangaroo Paw (Anigozanthos spp.) red orange flowers

Kangaroo Paw (Anigozanthos spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Anigozanthos spp.

Hardiness Zones: 10-11 (often grown as houseplants in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Kangaroo Paws have unique, tubular flowers resembling kangaroo paws. They come in various colors, including red, orange, and yellow. Kangaroo Paw plants are native to Australia and are attractive additions to tropical gardens.

  1. Lily of the Nile (Agapanthus africanus)

White flower clusters of the Lily of the Nile (Agapanthus africanus)

Lily of the Nile (Agapanthus africanus) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Agapanthus africanus

Hardiness Zones: 6-11

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Lilies of the Nile is a genus of perennial plants native to South Africa. They have clusters of funnel-shaped flowers in shades of blue or white. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in well-drained soil. Lilies of the Nile add elegance to borders and container gardens.

  1. Nemesia (Nemesia spp.)

Nemesia flowers in white, yellow, and red colors

Nemesia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Nemesia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Nemesias are charming annuals with delicate, trumpet-shaped flowers in various shades, including purple, pink, and white. They have a sweet, honey-like fragrance and bloom profusely throughout the growing season. Nemesias are excellent for borders, containers, and hanging baskets, adding a touch of elegance and fragrance to gardens.

  1. Tiger Lily (Lilium lancifolium)

Tiger Lily (Lilium lancifolium) orange flowers with black spots

Tiger Lily (Lilium lancifolium) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lilium lancifolium

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Tiger Lilies boast large, orange, or red flowers covered in dark spots, resembling a tiger’s coat. They are hardy perennials, naturalizing easily and adding a touch of exotic beauty to gardens. Tiger Lilies are attractive to pollinators and create striking focal points in landscapes.

  1. Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

White to pink flowers of Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Uva Ursi (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Hardiness Zones: 2-7

Plant Type: Ground Cover

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Uva Ursi, also known as bearberry, is a low-growing ground cover with small, bell-shaped pink or white flowers and glossy, evergreen leaves. It produces red berries and is often used for erosion control and in rock gardens, providing year-round interest with its foliage.

  1. Vinca (Vinca minor)

Blooming purple flowers of Vinca (Vinca minor)

Vinca (Vinca minor) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Vinca minor

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Ground Cover

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Vinca, also known as periwinkle, forms a dense carpet of glossy green leaves and produces blue or purple flowers. It is an excellent ground cover plant, thriving in shaded areas where few other plants grow. Vinca is valued for its ability to suppress weeds and add a splash of color to shaded landscapes.

  1. Windflower (Anemone nemorosa)

Blooming white Windflower (Anemone nemorosa) with green foliage in the garden

Windflower (Anemone nemorosa) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Anemone nemorosa

Hardiness Zones: 4-7

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Windflowers, also known as wood anemones, produce delicate, star-shaped flowers in shades of white, pink, or blue. They bloom in early spring and thrive in woodlands and shaded gardens. Windflowers symbolize anticipation and are perfect for naturalizing under trees and shrubs.

  1. Xerophyllum (Xerophyllum tenax)

White flowers of Xerophyllum (Xerophyllum tenax)

Xerophyllum (Xerophyllum tenax) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Xerophyllum tenax

Hardiness Zones: 4-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Xerophyllum, also known as beargrass, features tall, grass-like leaves and produces feathery, ivory-white flowers on tall spikes. It is native to North America and is often used in floral arrangements and traditional Native American crafts.

  1. Yerba Buena (Clinopodium douglasii)

Yerba Buena (Clinopodium douglasii) green leaves

Yerba Buena (Clinopodium douglasii) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Clinopodium douglasii

Hardiness Zones: 7-10

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Yerba Buena is a fragrant, creeping ground cover with small, lavender-blue flowers and aromatic leaves. It is native to North America and is often used in herbal teas and medicinal remedies. Yerba Buena is an excellent choice for shaded areas and woodland gardens.

  1. Zenobia (Zenobia pulverulenta)

White flowers of Zenobia (Zenobia pulverulenta)

Zenobia (Zenobia pulverulenta) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Zenobia pulverulenta

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Zenobia is a deciduous shrub with clusters of pink or white flowers and attractive, grayish-green foliage. It blooms in late spring to early summer and is native to the southeastern United States. Zenobia adds a touch of elegance to native plant gardens and natural landscapes.

  1. Agastache (Agastache spp.)

Purple flower clusters of Agastache

Agastache – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Agastache spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-10

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Agastaches, also known as hyssops or hummingbird mints, have spiky clusters of tubular flowers in shades of purple, pink, or orange. They are highly attractive to pollinators, especially hummingbirds and bees. Agastaches are aromatic, deer-resistant, and are perfect for herb gardens and wildlife-friendly landscapes.

  1. Baptisia (Baptisia spp.)

Baptisia purple flowers

Baptisia – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Baptisia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Baptisias, also known as false indigos, are herbaceous perennials with pea-like flowers in shades of blue, yellow, or white. They have attractive, blue-green foliage and are drought-tolerant once established. Baptisias are excellent for cottage gardens and naturalized landscapes.

  1. Corydalis (Corydalis spp.)

Selective focus of white Corydalis flowers

Corydalis – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Corydalis spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Corydalis plants produce delicate, fern-like foliage and clusters of tubular flowers in shades of pink, purple, or yellow. They bloom in early spring and are ideal for shaded gardens and woodland areas. Corydalis adds a graceful, airy quality to landscapes.

  1. Bishop’s Flower (Ammi majus)

Selective focus of white Bishop's Flower (Ammi majus)

Bishop’s Flower (Ammi majus) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Ammi majus

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Bishop’s Flowers, also known as laceflowers, produce delicate, lacy white blooms that resemble Queen Anne’s Lace. They are excellent for cut arrangements and are loved for their airy, ethereal appearance in gardens.

  1. Catmint (Nepeta spp.)

Lavender flowers of Catmint (Nepeta spp.)

Catmint (Nepeta spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Nepeta spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Catmint, a member of the mint family, offers spikes of lavender-blue flowers and aromatic foliage. It’s a favorite among pollinators, especially bees and butterflies. Catmint is drought-tolerant and adds a touch of elegance to herb gardens and borders.

  1. Fritillaria (Fritillaria spp.)

Selective focus of purple Fritillaria flowers

Fritillaria – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Fritillaria spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Bulbous Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Fritillarias are unique spring-blooming bulbs with bell-shaped flowers in shades of purple, yellow, or white. Some varieties, like the Crown Imperial Fritillaria, have striking clusters of drooping, bell-shaped blooms. They add intrigue to gardens and are perfect for rock gardens and woodland settings.

  1. Gazania (Gazania rigens)

Blooming red orange Gazania (Gazania rigens) flowers with dark green foliage

Gazania (Gazania rigens) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gazania rigens

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Gazanias, also known as treasure flowers, feature daisy-like blooms in vibrant shades of yellow, orange, pink, or red. They are drought-tolerant and bloom profusely throughout the summer, adding a burst of color to gardens and containers. Gazanias are low-maintenance and thrive in sunny locations.

  1. Hellebore (Helleborus spp.)

Hellebore (Helleborus spp.) burgundy flowers with a yellow center

Hellebore (Helleborus spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Helleborus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Hellebores, also known as Lenten Roses, produce elegant, cup-shaped flowers in shades of white, pink, purple, or green. They bloom in late winter to early spring, often while there’s still snow on the ground, making them valuable early bloomers. Hellebores are shade-loving and deer-resistant.

  1. Hosta (Hosta spp.)

White flowers on Hosta about to bloom

Hosta – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Hosta spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Hostas are known for their lush foliage and elegant, lavender or white flowers on tall spikes. They thrive in shaded areas and are popular for their varied leaf shapes and colors. Hostas are excellent for creating texture and contrast in gardens and are low-maintenance plants.

  1. Lavatera (Lavatera trimestris)

Macro of a blooming white Lavatera (Lavatera trimestris) flower

Lavatera (Lavatera trimestris) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lavatera trimestris

Hardiness Zones: 7-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Lavateras, also known as tree mallows, have large, hibiscus-like flowers in shades of pink, purple, or white. They bloom profusely throughout the summer and are great for adding height and color to gardens. Lavateras are excellent for borders and cottage gardens.

  1. Montbretia (Crocosmia spp.)

Closeup of red Montbretia (Crocosmia spp.) flowers

Montbretia (Crocosmia spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Crocosmia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 6-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Montbretias produce arching stems of funnel-shaped flowers in shades of orange, yellow, or red. They bloom in late summer and are valued for their vibrant colors. Montbretias are excellent for adding a pop of color to borders and are attractive to hummingbirds and bees.

  1. Passion Flower (Passiflora spp.)

Passion Flower (Passiflora spp.) with dark green foliage

Passion Flower (Passiflora spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Passiflora spp.

Hardiness Zones: 6-11

Plant Type: Perennial Vine

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Passion Flowers are intricate, exotic-looking blooms with unique structures and vibrant colors. They are often grown as vines and add a tropical touch to gardens. Passion Flowers are symbolic, representing the passion of Christ, and are ideal for trellises and arbors.

  1. Statice (Limonium spp.)

Purple Statice (Limonium spp.) flowers

Statice (Limonium spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Limonium spp.

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Statice, also known as sea lavender, has clusters of tiny, papery flowers in shades of blue, purple, pink, or white. They are excellent for dried flower arrangements and add a subtle, delicate beauty to gardens. Statice is drought-tolerant and blooms from summer to fall.

  1. Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima)

White flower clusters of Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima)

Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lobularia maritima

Hardiness Zones: 5-9 (often grown as annuals in colder zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Sweet Alyssum is a low-growing, fragrant flower that forms dense clusters of small, white, pink, or purple blooms. It’s known for its sweet, honey-like fragrance, making it a favorite for gardens and borders. Sweet Alyssum is excellent for attracting pollinators like bees and butterflies and is often used as ground cover or in containers, where its delicate blossoms add a touch of charm.

  1. Azalea (Rhododendron spp.)

Pink Azalea (Rhododendron spp.) flowers with green leaves

Azalea (Rhododendron spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Rhododendron spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Azaleas are stunning flowering shrubs known for their vibrant, trumpet-shaped blooms in shades of pink, red, purple, orange, white, and yellow. They typically bloom in spring, creating a breathtaking display of color. Azaleas are ideal for shady gardens and woodland landscapes, adding a burst of brightness in early spring.

  1. Violet (Viola sororia)

Violet (Viola sororia) flowers with green leaves

Violet (Viola sororia) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Viola sororia

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Violets are charming, low-growing perennials with delicate, five-petaled flowers in shades of blue, purple, white, and yellow. They bloom in early spring and are often fragrant. Violets are excellent for ground cover and are perfect for shaded areas under trees and along borders, adding a touch of elegance to the garden.

  1. Bellflower (Campanula spp.)

Selective focus on purple Bellflower (Campanula spp.)

Bellflower (Campanula spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Campanula spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Bellflowers are charming perennials known for their bell-shaped flowers in shades of blue, purple, pink, or white. They bloom in late spring and summer, adding a touch of elegance to gardens and borders. Bellflowers are ideal for cottage gardens and rockeries, creating a delightful, cottage-like atmosphere.

  1. Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis)

Closeup shot on white Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) flowers

Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Galanthus nivalis

Hardiness Zones: 3-7

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Snowdrops are small, delicate perennials with drooping, white flowers that bloom in late winter or early spring, often peeking through the snow. They are a symbol of hope and renewal and are perfect for woodland gardens and naturalizing under trees. Snowdrops are one of the earliest signs of spring.

  1. Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis spp.)

Blue flowers of Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis spp.)

Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Myosotis spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Forget-Me-Nots are dainty flowers with tiny, sky-blue blossoms and yellow centers. They symbolize true love and memories, making them popular in gardens and floral arrangements. Forget-Me-Nots bloom in spring and are excellent for borders, containers, and wildflower gardens.

  1. Beech Tree (Fagus spp.)

Beech Tree (Fagus spp.) flowers against the blue sky

Beech Tree (Fagus spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Fagus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Tree

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Beech Trees are majestic deciduous trees known for their smooth gray bark and vibrant green leaves that turn golden-bronze in fall. They are slow-growing and can live for centuries, providing shade and a sense of grandeur to landscapes. Beech Trees are excellent as focal points in large gardens and parks.

  1. Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa)

Selective focus on the white flowers of Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa)

Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Prunus spinosa

Hardiness Zones: 4-8

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Blackthorn, also known as Sloe, is a deciduous shrub with thorny branches and small, fragrant white flowers in early spring. It produces dark blue-black fruits used for making sloe gin and preserves. Blackthorn is often planted as hedging and is valuable for its wildlife-attracting qualities.

  1. Butterfly Bush (Buddleja spp.)

Pink flowers of Butterfly Bush (Buddleja spp.)

Butterfly Bush (Buddleja spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Buddleja spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Butterfly Bushes are large, fast-growing shrubs with elongated clusters of fragrant flowers in shades of purple, pink, white, or yellow. They are named for their ability to attract butterflies and other pollinators. Butterfly Bushes bloom from summer to fall and are excellent for butterfly gardens and sunny borders.

  1. Dusty Miller (Jacobaea maritima)

Macro on the silvery-white leaves of Dusty Miller (Jacobaea maritima)

Dusty Miller (Jacobaea maritima) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Jacobaea maritima

Hardiness Zones: Annual (grown as an annual in most zones)

Plant Type: Perennial (usually grown as an annual)

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Dusty Miller is a silvery-gray perennial often grown as an annual for its striking foliage. Its finely divided leaves have a velvety texture, creating a lovely contrast in gardens and containers. Dusty Miller is valued for its ability to add a touch of elegance and sophistication to floral arrangements and garden borders.

  1. Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

Yellow flowers of Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Oenothera biennis

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Biennial/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Evening Primrose is a biennial or perennial plant known for its bright yellow flowers that bloom in the late afternoon and evening. It is prized for its medicinal properties and is used in herbal remedies. Evening Primrose is also attractive to pollinators, making it a beneficial addition to wildflower gardens and natural landscapes.

  1. Foxtail Lily (Eremurus spp.)

Yellow Foxtail Lily (Eremurus spp.) in the garden

Foxtail Lily (Eremurus spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Eremurus spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Foxtail Lily, also known as Desert Candle, is a tall perennial plant with a spike of densely packed, bell-shaped flowers in various colors, including white, yellow, orange, and pink. Its unique appearance adds drama to gardens and floral arrangements, making it a favorite for ornamental gardens and large bouquets.

  1. Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa)

White and purple Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa) flowers

Globe Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Gomphrena globosa

Hardiness Zones: Annual (grown as an annual in most zones)

Plant Type: Annual

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Globe Amaranth, also known as Bachelor’s Button, is a compact annual plant with globe-shaped flower heads in vibrant shades of purple, pink, red, orange, and white. These long-lasting flowers retain their color even when dried, making them popular for crafts and arrangements. Globe Amaranth is excellent for borders, containers, and cutting gardens, adding a burst of color and texture to any setting.

  1. Impatiens (Impatiens spp.)

Pink Impatiens (Impatiens spp.) flowers with green leaves

Impatiens (Impatiens spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

 

Botanical Name: Impatiens spp.

Hardiness Zones: Annual (grown as an annual in most zones)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial (some varieties are perennial)

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Impatiens, commonly known as Busy Lizzies, are popular shade-loving plants with vibrant, colorful flowers in shades of pink, orange, purple, red, and white. They bloom profusely from spring to fall, adding a burst of color to shaded gardens and containers. Impatiens are valued for their ability to thrive in low-light conditions, making them a favorite choice for shady spots.

  1. Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema spp.)

Brown Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema spp.) flower with green leaves

Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Arisaema spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Jack-in-the-Pulpit is a unique woodland plant with intriguing hood-like structures (spathes) that enclose a spikelike flower cluster. The flowers come in various shades of green, brown, and purple. This plant is valued for its unusual appearance and is often grown for its ornamental value in shaded gardens and natural woodland settings.

  1. Jasmine (Jasminum spp.)

Jasmine (Jasminum spp.) flowers with green leaves

Jasmine (Jasminum spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Jasminum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 6-11

Plant Type: Shrub/Vine

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Jasmine plants are known for their fragrant, star-shaped white or yellow flowers and are prized for their sweet scent. They are often used in perfumes, teas, and traditional medicine. Jasmine vines or shrubs are excellent for trellises, fences, or as ground covers, creating a delightful atmosphere with their pleasant aroma and elegant appearance.

  1. Grevillea (Grevillea spp.)

Grevillea (Grevillea spp.) pink flowers closeup shot

Grevillea (Grevillea spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Grevillea spp.

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (typically grown as a tender perennial in colder zones)

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Grevilleas are evergreen shrubs native to Australia, known for their unique, toothbrush-like flowers in shades of red, orange, yellow, and pink. They bloom throughout the year, attracting birds and pollinators to the garden. Grevilleas are drought-tolerant and are ideal for sunny, well-drained gardens, adding a touch of exotic beauty to the landscape.

  1. Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis)

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) green leaves

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Melissa officinalis

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Lemon Balm is a fragrant herb known for its lemon-scented leaves. It produces small, white flowers and is often used for culinary purposes, teas, and herbal remedies. Lemon Balm is attractive to pollinators, making it a beneficial addition to herb gardens and natural landscapes. It is also valued for its calming properties, often used in herbal teas for relaxation.

  1. Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis)

Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis) white flowers with green leaves

Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Convallaria majalis

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Lily of the Valley is a charming woodland plant with delicate, bell-shaped white flowers and a sweet, intoxicating fragrance. It spreads via rhizomes and forms lush ground covers in shaded areas. Lily of the Valley is associated with romance and is often used in bridal bouquets and perfumes. It thrives in shady gardens and provides an enchanting atmosphere with its graceful blooms and enticing aroma.

  1. Maranta (Maranta spp.)

Variegated leaves of the Maranta (Maranta spp.) on a white pot

Maranta (Maranta spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Maranta spp.

Hardiness Zones: 11-12 (typically grown as a houseplant in colder zones)

Plant Type: Perennial (usually grown indoors as a houseplant)

Sun Exposure: Indirect Sunlight

Maranta, also known as Prayer Plant, is a popular indoor plant appreciated for its ornamental leaves that fold up in the evening, resembling hands in prayer. Its leaves are often variegated with patterns of different shades of green, making it an attractive addition to indoor spaces. Marantas are relatively low-maintenance and bring a touch of nature indoors.

  1. Oleander (Nerium oleander)

Pink flowers of Oleander (Nerium oleander) with green leaves

Oleander (Nerium oleander) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Nerium oleander

Hardiness Zones: 9-11 (typically grown as a shrub or small tree in warmer zones)

Plant Type: Shrub/Small Tree

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Oleander is a drought-tolerant shrub or small tree with lance-shaped leaves and showy, funnel-shaped flowers in shades of pink, red, yellow, or white. It blooms profusely in warm climates and is often used for landscaping and hedging. Oleander is prized for its ornamental value but should be handled with caution as all parts of the plant are highly toxic if ingested.

  1. Borage (Borago officinalis)

Closeup shot of blue Borage (Borago officinalis) flowers

Borage (Borago officinalis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Borago officinalis

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (typically grown as an annual)

Plant Type: Annual/Herb

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Borage is a herbaceous annual plant with bright blue, star-shaped flowers and hairy leaves. It’s not only ornamental but also edible, with a cucumber-like flavor. Borage is popular in culinary dishes and is also used for medicinal purposes. Additionally, it attracts pollinators, making it a beneficial addition to gardens.

  1. Canterbury Bells (Campanula medium)

Closeup shot of pink Canterbury Bells (Campanula medium)

Canterbury Bells (Campanula medium) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Campanula medium

Hardiness Zones: 4-10 (typically grown as a biennial or short-lived perennial)

Plant Type: Biennial/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Canterbury Bells are biennial or short-lived perennial plants with bell-shaped flowers in shades of blue, pink, purple, or white. They add a touch of cottage garden charm and are excellent for borders, containers, and cut flowers. Canterbury Bells require well-draining soil and are loved for their nostalgic appeal in traditional gardens.

  1. Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

Macro of a red Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Lobelia cardinalis

Hardiness Zones: 2-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Cardinal Flower is a perennial plant with striking, tubular, scarlet-red flowers that bloom in late summer. It’s a favorite among hummingbirds and butterflies, making it a valuable addition to wildlife gardens. Cardinal Flowers thrive in moist, rich soil and add vibrant color to wetland gardens, stream banks, or woodland areas.

  1. Daylily (Hemerocallis spp.)

Orange Daylily (Hemerocallis spp.) flower

Daylily (Hemerocallis spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Hemerocallis spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-10

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Daylilies are perennial plants with grass-like leaves and vibrant, trumpet-shaped flowers in various colors, including yellow, orange, red, and purple. They are known for their hardiness and long blooming period, often flowering for several weeks. Daylilies are popular for their low-maintenance nature and are perfect for borders, mass plantings, or naturalizing areas.

  1. Eupatorium (Eupatorium spp.)

Blooming white Eupatorium flowers

Eupatorium – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Eupatorium spp.

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Eupatorium, also known as Joe-Pye Weed, is a perennial plant with large, dome-shaped clusters of tiny, nectar-rich flowers in shades of pink or purple. It’s a favorite among pollinators, including butterflies and bees. Eupatoriums are ideal for wildflower gardens, rain gardens, or naturalized areas, adding height and ecological value to the landscape.

  1. Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculata)

Pink flower clusters of Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculata)

Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculata) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Phlox paniculata

Hardiness Zones: 4-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Garden Phlox is a perennial plant known for its fragrant, clustered flowers in shades of pink, purple, white, or red. It blooms in summer and is a favorite among pollinators, including butterflies and hummingbirds. Garden Phlox is excellent for borders, cottage gardens, or mixed perennial beds, adding vibrant color and fragrance to the landscape.

  1. Gas Plant (Dictamnus albus)

Gas Plant (Dictamnus albus) with pink flowers

Gas Plant (Dictamnus albus) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Dictamnus albus

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Gas Plant, also known as Burning Bush or Dittany, is a perennial plant with fragrant, star-shaped flowers in shades of pink, purple, or white. What makes it unique is its ability to produce flammable oils that can be ignited in warm weather, creating a temporary “gas flame.” Gas Plants are prized for their ornamental value and are suitable for rock gardens or sunny borders.

  1. Foamflower (Tiarella spp.)

Foamflower (Tiarella spp.) flower spikes with white and pink shades

Foamflower (Tiarella spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Tiarella spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

Foamflower is a low-growing perennial plant with delicate, frothy flower spikes and lobed leaves. It blooms in spring, producing small, star-shaped flowers in shades of white or pink. Foamflowers are shade-loving plants and are excellent for woodland gardens, borders, or as ground covers. They create a carpet of charming blooms in shaded areas.

  1. Hens and Chicks (Sempervivum spp.)

Pink flowers of Hens and Chicks (Sempervivum spp.)

Hens and Chicks (Sempervivum spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Sempervivum spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial/Succulent

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Hens and Chicks, also known as Houseleeks, are succulent perennials forming rosette-shaped clusters. They come in various colors and textures and are drought-tolerant, making them excellent choices for rock gardens, containers, or living walls. Hens and Chicks reproduce by producing offsets, creating a charming display over time.

  1. Holly (Ilex spp.)

Holly (Ilex spp.) green leaves and red berries

Holly (Ilex spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Ilex spp.

Hardiness Zones: 3-11 (depending on species and variety)

Plant Type: Shrub/Tree

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Holly plants are evergreen shrubs or trees known for their glossy, spiky leaves and bright red berries (in female plants). They are popular for holiday decorations and landscaping. Hollies provide year-round interest, with some species offering variegated foliage. They are valued for their ornamental and privacy-enhancing properties in gardens and landscapes.

  1. Ice Plant (Delosperma spp.)

Ice Plant (Delosperma spp.) with purple flowers

Ice Plant (Delosperma spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Delosperma spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial/Succulent

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Ice Plants are low-growing succulents with fleshy leaves and daisy-like flowers in vibrant colors, such as pink, purple, orange, or yellow. They are drought-tolerant and thrive in sunny, well-drained locations. Ice Plants are excellent ground covers, especially in dry or coastal gardens, where they create a dense carpet of colorful blooms.

  1. Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule)

Selective focus on the orange flowers of Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule)

Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Papaver nudicaule

Hardiness Zones: 2-7 (typically grown as an annual)

Plant Type: Annual/Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Iceland Poppies are cool-season flowering plants with delicate, papery flowers in shades of orange, yellow, pink, or white. They bloom in spring and early summer, adding a touch of brightness to gardens and containers. Iceland Poppies are often grown as annuals in colder regions but can act as short-lived perennials in milder climates.

  1. Kniphofia (Kniphofia spp.)

Kniphofia (Kniphofia spp.) flowers with yellow and orange shades

Kniphofia (Kniphofia spp.) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Kniphofia spp.

Hardiness Zones: 5-9

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Kniphofias, also known as Red Hot Pokers or Torch Lilies, are perennials known for their tall spikes of tubular flowers in shades of red, orange, yellow, or bi-colors. They bloom in summer and are excellent for attracting hummingbirds to the garden. Kniphofias are drought-tolerant and add vertical interest to borders, cottage gardens, or xeriscapes.

  1. Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

Selective focus of yellow flower clusters of Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla mollis)

Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Alchemilla mollis

Hardiness Zones: 3-8

Plant Type: Perennial

Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Sun

Lady’s Mantle is a perennial plant with scalloped, velvety leaves and frothy clusters of tiny, chartreuse-yellow flowers. It blooms in late spring and early summer, creating a soft, airy effect in the garden. Lady’s Mantle is valued for its ornamental foliage and is often used in borders, rock gardens, or as ground cover. Its leaves can hold droplets of water after rain, enhancing its visual appeal.

  1. Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius)

Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) white flowers

Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Physocarpus opulifolius

Hardiness Zones: 3-7

Plant Type: Shrub

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Ninebark is a deciduous shrub known for its peeling bark and attractive foliage. It produces clusters of small, white or pink flowers in spring, followed by ornamental seed pods. Ninebark shrubs come in various cultivars with colorful foliage, adding visual interest to hedges, borders, or foundation plantings. They are low-maintenance and tolerate a range of soil conditions.

  1. Ornamental Kale (Brassica oleraceavar. acephala)

Ornamental Kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with pink, purple, and white shades

Ornamental Kale – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Brassica oleracea var. acephala

Hardiness Zones: 2-11 (typically grown as a cool-season annual)

Plant Type: Annual/Ornamental

Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Ornamental Kale, also known as Flowering Kale, is a cold-season annual plant valued for its vibrant, frilly leaves that come in shades of pink, purple, white, or green. It forms rosettes of colorful foliage, making it a popular choice for fall and winter gardens, containers, or ornamental displays. Ornamental Kale adds texture and color to landscapes during cooler months.

  1. Pampas Grass (Cortaderia selloana)

White plumes of Pampas Grass (Cortaderia selloana) in a green lawn

Pampas Grass (Cortaderia selloana) – Photo Credit: Shutterstock.

Botanical Name: Cortaderia selloana

Hardiness Zones: 7-11

Plant Type: Grass/Ornamental Grass

Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Pampas Grass is a large, ornamental grass with tall, feathery flower plumes in shades of white or pink. It blooms in late summer and fall, creating a dramatic focal point in the landscape. Pampas Grass is valued for its ornamental appeal and is often used as a privacy screen, in large landscapes, or as a background plant in gardens.

FAQs

What are the most popular flowers?

The popularity of flowers can vary by region and personal preference, but some universally popular flowers include roses, tulips, lilies, daisies, and sunflowers.

How many types of flowers are there?

There are over 300,000 species of flowering plants in the world, which can be further classified into thousands of genera and families.

What are the types of flowering plants?

Flowering plants, also known as angiosperms, are divided into two main groups: monocots and dicots. Monocots have one cotyledon (seed leaf), parallel leaf veins, and flower parts in multiples of three. Dicots have two cotyledons, net-like leaf veins, and flower parts in multiples of four or five.

What is the most popular flower in the world?

The rose is often considered the most popular flower in the world. It is widely cultivated for its beauty, fragrance, and various colors, and it holds symbolic significance in many cultures across the globe.

 

Other Flower Guides from Planet Natural

27 Black Flowers: Exploring Nature’s Dark Elegance

39 Best Pink Flowering Trees for Your Yard and Landscaping

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