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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  E. Vinje 1 year ago.

  • What kills mealybugs on hibiscus?

    Created by Kperez on

    How can I eliminate mealybugs safely from my hibiscus plants? I have tried everything including commercial products and farmer experts, and the insects persist. Help!

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  • #248096 Reply

    E. Vinje
    Keymaster

    Hello –

    It is possible to control mealybugs on hibiscus plants using beneficial insects, insecticidal soaps, and other natural techniques. The following is from our mealybug control page.

    Prune out light infestations or dab insects with a Q-tip dipped in rubbing alcohol.

    Do not over water or overfertilize — mealybugs are attracted to plants with high nitrogen levels and soft growth.

    Commercially available beneficial insects, such as ladybugs, lacewing and the Mealybug Destroyer (Cryptolaemus montrouzieri), are important natural predators of this pest.

    Use the Bug Blaster to hose off plants with a strong stream of water and reduce pest numbers. Washing foliage regularly with a leaf shine — made from neem oil — will help discourage future infestations.

    Safer® Insecticidal Soap will work fast on heavy infestations. A short-lived natural pesticide, it works by damaging the outer layer of soft-bodied insect pests, causing dehydration and death within hours. Apply 2.5 oz/ gallon of water when insects are present, repeat every 7-10 day as needed.

    Neem oil disrupts the growth and development of pest insects and has repellent and anti-feedant properties. Best of all, it’s non-toxic to honey bees and many other beneficial insects. Mix 1 oz/ gallon of water and spray every 7-14 days, as needed.

    Fast-acting botanical insecticides should be used as a last resort. Derived from plants which have insecticidal properties, these natural pesticides have fewer harmful side effects than synthetic chemicals and break down more quickly in the environment.

    Washing foliage regularly with a leaf shine will help discourage future infestations.

    Hope it helps!

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