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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Elana 2 years, 5 months ago.

  • Cloning gel and edible plants

    Created by ElanaB on

    Thank you for answering this question. I went ahead and ordered Olivia’s cloning gel after speaking to one of your people on the phone today. He went out of his way to read the ingredients on the label, and it sounded safe enough to go ahead and give it a try. It is intimidating when right on the label they stay not safe for edible plants; I wasn’t sure if there is any real reason, if the ingredients have even been tested, but want to be an organic grower. The other aspect is that once the plant is fully mature, would there even be any residues of this material in the plant itself?
    Anyway, thank you for your attention to this matter.
    ElanaB

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  • #185346 Reply

    E. Vinje
    Keymaster

    I think the biggest reason there is no root enhancer approved for organic production lies within the core values of organic production. Though plants do possess these hormones naturally it’s considered unnatural for most herbaceous plants to produce roots from a simple cutting. Plants are living, respiring individuals; they are constantly cycling nutrients, water, and microorganisms. Without intense scientific study, it’s almost impossible to know if residues would remain in mature plant material.

    Have a beautiful day!

    #185361 Reply

    Elana
    Member

    Hi Eric,
    Good point, and one I hadn’t really considered. Due to the costs involved in purchasing some kinds of seeds, cloning becomes a subject of great interest and necessity for some. Also when one finds a variety of any plant that is superior, it is natural to want to preserve that plant in production. Once again I appreciate your responses; I did find one reference to using willow bark water as a cloning aid but have not tried that yet. And then perhaps I’m not as purist as I thought! I am going to try a comparison of Clonex and Olivia’s for fun. I’m beginning to think this is a question “not tending to edification” especially since it will probably never be scientifically studied! I guess we just do our best, give our best effort and the results will speak for themselves. Have a wonderful weekend,
    Elana

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