Whitefly Parasite

Whitefly Parasite

Whiteflies are harmful to both outdoor and indoor plants by sucking plant sap. Under certain conditions, they can also transmit disease. The whitefly parasite (Encarsia formosa) lays its eggs — as many as 50 to 100 — in both pupae and later larval stages of the white fly, destroying them before they can become adults. The host larva turns black as the parasite develops. It emerges, depending on conditions, in about two weeks. The adults will also feed on the larval juices released when they puncture the larvae.

Attracted to the flies by the smell of the honeydew they produce, E. formosa is an efficient biological control of whitefly and one of the most cost effective ways to control greenhouse and indoor infestations of the pest.

Humidity and strong light encourage the parasite’s activity. Temperature is also key as the parasite will not fly and seek out new prey at temperatures under 62 degrees. Its preference for warm, humid, well-lit conditions make the whitefly parasite the perfect solution for indoor and greenhouse whitefly problems.

Parasitized Larva (black)
Nymph Parasitization
Encarsia formosa
Parasitized Larva
Whitefly Parasitization
 Encarsia formosa

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