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This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Anonymous 3 years, 10 months ago.

  • Gravel pit, hand labor reclamation!

    Created by Anonymous on
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    Anonymous

    Lots of hard work with little success for several years, but finding more and more tricks to try to get things growing.

    Most of the pit is 1 foot deep soil witch frost action has put many rocks through up to the surface, almost impossible to get anything to grow in that!

    Lots of rock picking for rock gardens/stone mulch/stone snow fences etc. these help a lot!

    The rock picking also keeps the place mow-able. Hand mowing for exercise and thriftiness, last summer I got started on switching to reel mowing, the grass grows better and I recover faster without having breathed the exhaust fumes! Being careful to let the grass go to seed before final cutting has got vegetation growing much thicker with help from mulch from the clippings (almost like covering grass seed with straw to help conserve moisture).

    One and two gallon sprayers helped get me in shape for lots of spraying with a three gallon backpack sprayer, putting fish emulsions in with Mi-crop Nitrogen Fixing Micro Algae keeps the clay soil in the Mi-crop from clogging the sprayer, applying Pyganic with molasses in to attract grasshoppers to eat what has been sprayed and fish emulsions to deter what ever animals that come around seems to do good!

    A clump of cottonwood and or poplars has come up all on it's own down in the very bottom most part of the gravel pit, and now due to punning and beginning getting out of the drought, they are thriving, though now it's almost swampy down there, and I have to put lots of Epsom salts on with a hand held seed spreader to keep them green instead of yellow from to much water and to fight off whatever viruses may come along and attack them in the humidity.

    Mining off the rich topsoil that was piled at the edge of the pit to make a slope for safety of children/animals makes the beginning of a root cellar while providing soil for filling old tires to use as raised beds and fill flower pots.

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