Pest Control

With the growing evidence that chemical pesticides are harmful to human health, many gardeners are looking for smart, organic solutions for pest control. Most problem pests can be controlled naturally, eliminating the need for toxic pesticides or harmful chemicals. We provide the information – and experience – to help you maintain a beautiful, chemical-free yard and garden that’s healthy for you, your family and the environment.

Got bugs? Visit our Pest Problem Solver for help! Also, you can share tips and ask questions over at our Pest Control Forum page.

Natural Born Pest Killers

Scary SpiderAt Planet Natural, we offer natural pest control solutions that are guaranteed safe and effective with as little impact on the environment as possible. Most pest problems can be solved by natural means, eliminating the need for toxic pesticides or harmful chemicals altogether.

Our mission is to provide you with a solution for common household and garden pests with options from least toxic to more aggressive. From barriers and traps to minimally-processed products derived from natural compounds and plant oils, Planet Natural only carries the best. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed. (more…)

Keeping Mice From Your Compost Heap

Mouse in Compost PileMice in your compost bin can be a problem year-round, but especially in the winter.

We love mice, as long as they’re in a children’s book. Out in the real world? Not so much.

Mice are associated with everything from Lyme disease to hantavirus. Many of the diseases they transmit are harbored in their feces and it’s hard to top the disgusting feeling you get finding tiny, black mouse cylinders all over a kitchen counter. Don’t think the disease potential is bad or only doesn’t happens outside the dusty southwest? Read this poor fellow’s story (spoiler alert: he survives).

You probably do a good job keeping mice from inside your home. But keeping mice out of your compost is a different proposition. (more…)

Worm-Like Parasite Attacks Insect Pests

Insect Parasitic NematodesThese microscopic soil predators control lawn grubs and all kinds of garden pests.

The more we learn about lawn and garden pests, the more we’ve come to love beneficial nematodes. Part of this comes from our study of various grub and worm pests that spend some of their lives in the soil. The other comes from the enthusiastic stories we’ve heard about the value of these microscopic pest destroyers.

The stories offer curious examples of the trial-and-error ways we come to learn about the gardening craft. And it’s also about the value of an Integrated Pest Management program, one that uses a variety of practices to deal with pests at all stages of development, not just when we start noticing damage to our lawns or our fruits and vegetables. (more…)

Perfect Cabbage, Organic Miracle

Organic Garden CabbageThe priceless rewards of growing unblemished cabbage organically.

Our correspondent in Washington state’s Skagit River Valley farm country writes in:

We’re seeing all the signs of late harvest in farmers markets, small farms, and family gardens lately: winter squash of all sorts, pumpkins, turnips and rutabaga, beets, last crops of spinach that had been second planted in late summer. And then there’s cabbage.

We love big, tight heads of cabbage from plants that we set out right at last frost and then, these past months, watched grow. Like all long season crops, cabbages are prone to problems just because they’re around so long. Pests, always on the come and go, have all that time to find them. (more…)

Fall Pest Prevention

Garden Clean UpCleaning out garden debris also takes out harmful insect eggs and larvae.

We’ve been updating articles on the Planet Natural Pest Problem Solver — a handy resource for the organic gardener and those interested in Integrated Pest Management in our “Learning Center” pull downs on the homepage — and, in particular, going over sections on cabbage worms, asparagus beetles, loopers and the like. It occurred to us that with many pests that overwinter in decaying plant matter, there’s one thing you can do at the end of the season to put all those seedling stealing, leaf-eating, cabbage-ruining worms and beetles at a distinct disadvantage. Clean-up!

Taking away the foliage where the moths have laid eggs, where pupae hide, where a worm has burrowed into a green stem like a sleeping bag and is hoping for a mild winter, eliminates the chance that these pests will emerge in your garden come spring to start the destructive cycle all over again. Not only does removing the remains of your garden take out the pests hiding there, it also reduces the presence of disease and fungal wilt. (more…)

Organic Gardening Pest Control

Pest BugGardening is a relaxing hobby for some and a way of life for others. Regardless of why a person maintains a garden, they will want to keep it as healthy as possible. Gardens are susceptible to pests, which can destroy plants and flowers. While it is common practice to use pesticides, it is important to consider what types of pesticides are right for the environment and one’s health. There are many concerns about the use of synthetic pesticides, which have caused an increase in organic growing methods. There are many benefits that are associated with organic pest removal methods. To fully understand and appreciate these benefits, people should understand the pests that plague their gardens and how synthetic chemicals can be harmful. (more…)

Diatomaceous Earth and Bees

Honey BeeThis effective, organic pest killer (it’s not a poison) won’t hurt bees if used wisely.

Who hasn’t been bailed out by diatomaceous earth, basically a powder made of fossilized diatoms millions of years old? Keeping armies of slugs at bay, drawing a no-roach line between our apartment and our neighbors’ apartments, protecting seedlings from early season grubs and maggots. I’ve known people who’ve rubbed the stuff into their dog’s coat to stop fleas and heard that’s it’s a common big-city cure for bed bugs. (more…)

Organic Control of Aphids

Aphids and AntsOne of the most destructive pests in the home garden, aphids are also one of the most fascinating. Understand them to stop them.

Aphids seem to cause us problems both early and late in the growing season. We’ve found curling, yellowed leaves on chard within weeks of the plants emerging from the ground. Further examination revealed ants coursing up and down the stems. Looking carefully at the undersides of the forming leaves revealed why the ants were there: aphids! Clusters of the green and brown critters could be seen tucked away where the chard leaves created little pockets for them to hide. (more…)

These Bugs Raise A Stink

Stink BugHow to identify and control the brown marmorated stink bug.

They landed on our shores in Pennsylvania some 15 years ago and have since spread across the country, leaving a trail of destruction behind them. Voracious feeders, they’re not content to destroy our food sources. They’ve come to occupy our homes in ways that have changed the very nature of our lives. In an all-0ut effort to stop the invasion, humans have joined forces to bring an end to their march across America. And while some progress has been reported, the battle is far from over. (more…)

Bees, Butterflies Both Battling Demise

Protect our PollinatorsPesticide use may leave us a world without pollinators.

With good news comes bad. Preliminary reports from the winter of 2013-2014 gathered by the Department of Agriculture and the Bee Informed Partnership have found that loss of honey bee colonies from all causes was 23.2%, down from 30.5% the previous winter. For the full 12 months — April 2013 to April 2014 — the 7,183 beekeepers who responded to the survey reported losing 34.2% of their 670,568 colonies.

The full report can be found here.

How is this good news? The 23.2% figure is well below the 8-year average total loss of 29.6% and much less than the 36% loss suffered in 2007-2008. But hopes that bee colony collapse numbers have turned a corner are premature. (more…)

Lessons From the Garden

CrowA crow, a row of seedlings, and repeated frustration spotlight the adaptability and ingenuity of gardeners.

A friend of this blog, someone who’s good at seeing the big picture, writes in to tell us about a problem solved and how it reflects on the art and craft of gardening. It’s a good example of how we develop our gardening techniques over the years by paying attention, considering all the variables, and measuring the results. We’ve added a few follow-up links in his story, as we do in ours:

Our family loves sweet corn and every year I plant a “square” of corn; four or five-foot long rows, two of the rows planted a week or two after the first rows went in, an often in-vain attempt to extend the harvest. Somehow the corn all seems to arrive at the same time no matter how I stagger the planting. (more…)

Page 1 of 612345...Last »