Organic Gardens

Few pursuits are as rewarding as growing your own organic gardens. Not only do you get to enjoy the fruits of your own labor, but you have the satisfaction of knowing that the produce you are eating was grown free of chemicals, pesticides and herbicides. Growing organically produces healthy, more diverse ecosystems which are better able to resist significant pest damage… naturally!

We continually add to this blog, so please check back often. Also, you can search existing messages for answers or post a new message for others to reply to at our Organic Garden Forum page.

Sowing Seeds Directly In the Garden

Planting SeedsThe spring ritual of preparing soil and planting garden seed puts us in touch with both the past and the future.

Some of us live in places warm and weather-friendly enough that our gardens are already in. Some of us, with a possibility of frosts and even a heavy wet spring snow still to come, will continue to wait. But for many of us, now’s the time. All it will take is a couple sunny and warm days before we can sow seeds directly in our gardens. Sure, the peas and a few others might already be in. But where the weather turns suddenly — from winter to summer, as it often does here in Montana — we want to be ready.

So let’s pretend that it’s that most exciting (and anticipated) moment of the gardening season: planting time. We’ve gotten in and worked the soil, maybe spread some manure, worked in compost, and tinkered with the pH (after testing) using sulfur or lime. (more…)

Easy-To-Grow (Tasty, Too) Jerusalem Artichokes

Jerusalem ArtichokeThese toot-sweet (ha!) tubers, also known as sunchokes, are a healthy addition at meal time.

Your friendly and inquisitive Planet Natural Blogger once inherited a garden that had an established bed of Jerusalem artichokes. At the time we took it over, the artichokes were already growing and some, despite a rainy summer there in the great Northwest, were already sporting flowers. “We don’t do anything to ‘em,” the crusty old gardener from whom we bought the property told us. “They just come back every year.” “Whatta ya use them for?” we wanted to know. “Oh, all kinds of things,” he said, which we later found out included throwing a bunch of them to the couple of hogs he was raising. (more…)

Our Food, Our Health, Our Gardens

French FriesComparing organic and conventional produce, milk, more; poison and potato farms, and exposing corporate agriculture’s challenge to the nation.

One of the great reasons to garden organically is to assure that the food we put on the table for our friends and family is as healthy as it can be. But even the most intensive gardener can’t grow everything she or he brings to the kitchen. Here’s some recent food issues and related topics that have caught our eye here at Planet Natural. If you’ve seen other stories of interest to us and our readers (you!) then, please, by all means (including Facebook) let us know. (more…)

Grow Organic Potatoes

PotatoesKeep pesticides off your dinner table by growing your own chemical-free, heirloom potatoes.

Potatoes have always been a family favorite and for good reason. We associate them with Sunday dinners, Monday hash, and home-made Saturday night fries. We love baked potatoes topped with homemade salsa and home-fries with salsa and eggs. We use diced potatoes with cheese and green chile as an enchilada stuffing. In the fall, we make a delicious cheese and mushroom tart with a potato crust. We’ve even been known to make a potato and onion pizza with rosemary. And yes, like everybody else, we love garlic mashed potatoes. (more…)

Vegetables Not To Start Indoors . . .

Directly Sown Seeds. . . and why (plus how) to raise these plants indoors anyway.

Your friendly, impatient Planet Natural Blogger has a hard time waiting for the ideal time to start seeds, especially those that do best when directly sown in the garden. We’ve all heard how some vegetables shouldn’t be started indoors. Peas, beans, corn, and most definitely root vegetables (carrots, beets, turnips, and the like) do best planted right in the ground where you want them to grow. Starting them indoors can be a frustrating waste of time. And for different reasons.

Peas and bean germinate and grow well indoors. But transplanting sets them back. Plant some peas in your garden on the same day you transplant the peas you started indoors and within a month or less, the direct-sown peas have caught up with, even overtaken, the transplanted peas. Same with beans. (more…)

Using Cold Frames: A Year Round Gardening Tool

Cold Frame GardeningGive your garden plants a head-start and shelter from chilly spring weather with a versatile cold frame.

Springtime sees your friendly, think-ahead Planet Natural blogger putting his cold frame (PDF) to heavy use. Now, in a time of year where frosts are still possible, many of our indoor vegetable starts are almost ready to go into the garden. They need to get use to being outdoors. Many of them can’t survive the night-time cold but can when protected inside a cold frame, maybe draped with a blanket on the coldest nights.

It’s also the time of year we’ve also run out of room under our indoor grow light and need a place to keep vegetable starts where they’ll get more sunshine than they would on a window sill. (more…)

Gardening Blogs: A Growing Community

Gardening BlogGardeners share their experience and knowledge — with pictures! — online.

Friends and readers have questions: You’re always preaching patience this time of year. Wait until the last frost, wait until the soil is workable, don’t get into the garden too soon. That’s all well and good. But what do we do in the meantime?

Well, we’ve always counseled planning and dreaming. Plan your coming garden and landscape. Dream of what your yard, your vegetable patch will look like in just a few months. To facilitate that planning and stimulate that dreaming? Read.

Garden books and magazines have always been great sources of knowledge and inspiration and continue to be. While much of the publishing world is in a confused shamble, garden books continue to do well. (more…)

Starting Annual Flowers Indoors

Annual FlowersRaising your own flowering annuals gives you variety, costs savings, and home-grown quality.

Why would your start your own flowering annuals from seed when they’re readily available as starts at nurseries and big box stores? The answer is cost, selection, and quality.

Sure you can find marigolds and other common annuals as ready-to-plant starts. And they’re relatively inexpensive if you’re just growing a few here and there. But if you’re looking for unusual annuals, either heirlooms or strains of favorites that you can’t get just anywhere, well, then, you’ll have to start them yourself. And if you’re using annuals as borders, say along sidewalks, or filling an entire garden bed with color, then you’ll need a lot of starts and suddenly the cost of those individual plants start to add up. A packet or two that contain enough seed for your needs? Probably $5 or less (more…)

Organics Gain In Farm Bill

Farm BillLocal and organically grown foods, in demand now more than ever, get a nod from legislators.

There’s plenty in the recently passed Farm Bill that requires us to plug our noses. That’s true for nearly everyone, no matter which side of the ideological divide you’re on. Some say the Farm Bill is a hand out to corporate agriculture. Some say its a hand-out to poor families in the form of food stamps, called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program known as SNAP. No one is happy.

The often cranky British magazine The Economist points out why folks on both sides aren’t happy. It claims that 80% of the Farm Bill spending has nothing to do with farming. At the same time, it points out that 75% of the farm subsidies the bill provides are taken by the top 10% of farm business. (more…)

Growing the Perfect Radish

Organic RadishesRadishes are great for getting kids started with gardening. Here are tips to assure success.

Anybody can grow radishes. Even a kid can do it. But growing a good radish? Now that takes a little work and a lot of attention. And really, isn’t that exactly the kind of lesson you want to pass on to your little ones when it comes to gardening?

Radishes, a cool-weather crop, can be planted early, as soon as the soil can be worked and weeks before the last frost. In our household, they’re the first scratch on the itch to garden. Let’s go to the center of the country to gauge when you can sow radish seed. The Iowa State University Extension Service’s radish page says they can be planted in late March in the southern part of the state, in mid-April in the state’s northern counties. This suggests that they can be planted early, say February, further south. And in higher elevations and along the northern tier, try putting in radishes as soon as the snow is out and the soil is half-way friable. (more…)

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