Flower

Whether you’re planting bulbs, annuals or perennials, flower gardens add a beautiful splash of color throughout the season. While growing flowers is not difficult, there are many factors that must be considered prior to planting. The more closely these plans are based on meeting the needs of your plants, the more likely you are to be successful. Click on the blog articles below for ideas, guides and more.

Dahlias

DahliasPlanting different types of dahlia tubers will guarantee a summer rainbow of blossoms for years to come.

By Kim Haworth

Late summer brings up some of my favorite flowers. The first growing dahlia I ever met was in a hillside house I rented in Mill Valley. We had moved in during the winter months and were enchanted by the multiple surprises the garden revealed as winter turned to spring, then summer. One of the lovely things about moving into an older home is the opportunity to see the garden unfold, it’s rather like a surprise package.

The dahlias in Mill Valley were bright yellow and the tubers must have been in the ground for many years, because the flowers were the size of a dinner plate. They were the spidery shaped blooms, called ‘cactus form’ that looked like sunbursts. Magnificent! When we moved, I tried to take the tubers with me, but I’m afraid I did the plant a disservice. It never regained it’s former glory after the transplant. (more…)

Cosmos

CosmosPlant different varieties from starts or seed for colorful blossoms and fern-like leaves that make cosmos a lovely choice for borders and background.

Sunlight: Full sun to partial shade
Maturity: 65-90 days from seed to flower
Height: 24 to 60 inches
Spacing: 12 to 18 inches apart in all directions

Growing cosmos adds beauty to summer gardens, especially when planted in informal beds or used in mixed borders. Flowers come in striking reds and oranges or paler crimsons and cream. For arrangements, cut flowers shortly after bloom and place immediately in cold water. Shorter varieties are perfect for containers. (more…)

California Poppy

California PoppyWispy, bright California poppies are suitable for xeric (water conserving) gardens and provide a spectacular display of long-lasting colors.

Sunlight: Full sun
Maturity: 55-75 days from seed to flower
Height: 4 to 12 inches
Spacing: 4 to 8 inches apart in all directions

Home gardeners growing California poppies (Eschscholzia californica) are rewarded with their fern-like foliage and lively orange, red and yellow flowers. Easy going, drought-tolerant plants are a favorite for use in cointainer gardens, mixed beds, rock gardens and water-wise landscapes. (more…)

Calendula

Growing CalendulaAlso known as “pot marigold,” this easy to grow, healthful annual with its edible orange-and-yellow blossoms lasts all summer.

Sunlight: Full sun to partial shade
Maturity: 45-60 days from seed to flower
Height: 18 to 24 inches
Spacing: 24 to 36 inches apart in all directions

Growing calendula (Calendula officinalis) provides a spectacular display of light yellow to deep orange blooms from early summer until frost. Sun-loving plants are usually low and compact with attractive double blossoms that can be 2-1/2 to 4 inches across. Start in flats for early season flowering or sow directly in the garden. Gorgeous in patio pots or mixed borders. (more…)

Begonias

BegoniasProtect them over winter and begonia tubers will reward you with their striking colors, in pots and in beds.

By Kim Haworth

We drove down to Capitola recently to take photos of fuchsias. Capitola isn’t too far from the Bay Area and there is plenty to see once you are there. My favorite nursery on the coast is Antonelli Brothers, located on Capitola Road just south of Santa Cruz. Antonelli’s specializes in fuchsias and begonias – I guess that’s why Capitola is the begonia capitol of the world. They have an annual begonia festival in town to celebrate these magnificent tubers. (more…)

Bachelor Buttons

Bachelor ButtonsA popular annual that does well in most zones, Bachelor Button looks good behind borders, in arrangements and, of course, worn as boutonnieres!

Sunlight: Full sun
Maturity: 80-95 days from seed to flower
Height: 12 to 36 inches
Spacing: 6 to 12 inches apart in all directions

Native to Europe and Asia, home gardeners are growing bachelor buttons (Centaurea cyanus) for their frilly blossoms showing in pale blues, purples, pinks and reds. Also known as cornflowers, these jolly plants bloom throughout the summer months and are perfect for cuttings with their long “silvery” stems. Hardy annual, grows to 3 feet tall.

Fact: Discovered in the tomb of King Tutankhamen who died in 1340 B.C. The 1-1/2 inch blossoms were woven into a beautiful wreath and given to the King to aid in the afterlife. (more…)

Saving Flower Seeds

Saving SeedSave your own garden seed for planting next year. Here’s how.

One of the last — and most meaningful — end-of-season tasks is saving flower seeds for planting next year. We’re not talking about those hybrid seeds you got from the catalog. We’re talking about open-pollinated heirlooms, flowers that have been around longer than grandma. Their names are familiar and come together like words in a poem: Calendula, Four O’Clocks, Morning Glories, Petunias and Poppies.

If you’re lucky, you’ve been saving seed since you were a child, going out with grandma and gathering pods, seed heads or the seeds themselves for careful drying and preserving. Back when, we would put the seeds in grandma’s old pill bottles. Today we put them in tightly-sealed baggies. (more…)

Fall Planting, Spring Color

Garden BulbsPlant tulip, crocus, daffodil bulbs in autumn and have a burst of color in your landscape come spring.

Now’s the time to divide perennials, if you haven’t done so in the last few years. If your perennials are showing smaller blossoms or dying off in the center, then dig them up, clip the crowns, and spread them around after cutting out dead and crowded roots. They like room for their roots to grow. Keep the cutting moist until you’ve put them back in the soil. Do this early; don’t wait until there’s a chance that your soil will start to freeze. If there’s a question, wait until early spring, just as the ground thaws and the plants begin to show signs of life. Either way, be sure to add some compost to the soil where they’re planted. (more…)

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