GMOs

Are genetically modified organisms (GMOs) a threat to organic agriculture? Are they dangerous when consumed? Do they lead to higher use of chemical herbicides and pesticides? And why aren’t GMOs labeled so we know which foods are made with them? We find and discuss the latest news on this critical issue.

Feel strongly about this controversial topic? Please let us know what you think, in comments over at our GMO Forum page.

Oregon Counties Vote To Ban GMO Crops

Oregon GMO LabelingPassage complicated by state’s “Monsanto Protection Act.”

Oregon, now one of the major battlegrounds in the battle against GMOS, made news again last week when Jackson and Josephine counties on the state’s southern border with California voted overwhelmingly to ban the growing of crops that are genetically modified (PDF). The area, like much of Oregon, has a large number of organic and local farms who are threatened by genetic pollution spread from GMO crops.

The victory in Jackson County came despite a massive infusion of cash from outside interests to defeat the measure. As reported by Oregon Live, $1 million was collected in the attempt to defeat the measure. Some $455,000 of that total was donated by six bio-tech companies including Monsanto, Syngenta, and Dow. The rural county, with a population of 206,000, has 120,00 registered voters. Supporters of the bill raised some $300,000. (more…)

GMO Labeling Victory In Vermont

GMO LabelingState passes GMO labeling bill despite lies, corporate threats.

The Vermont House of Representatives on Wednesday of last week passed a bill requiring the labeling of foods with genetically modified ingredients. The bill, passed earlier by the Senate, will now go to the governor’s desk. Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin has indicated he will sign it.

The bill passed the House on a vote of 114 – 30. The usual corporate bullying techniques were used to no avail.

The vote capped a 20 year effort in Vermont to pass various types of legislation designed to protect consumers and organic farmers from GMO products. Unlike Maine and Connecticut, which earlier passed bills to label GMO products contingent on being joined by labeling in other states, the Vermont bill is stand alone, putting the requirement in effect regardless of the action of other states. (more…)

New Bill Would Block GMO Labeling

Mike PompeoKansas Representative wants to make your right-to-know illegal.

Representative Mike Pompeo, Republican of Kansas, introduced a bill earlier this month that would effectively block labeling of foods containing genetically modified ingredients at both the state and the national level. Pompeo’s bill is a nearly exact copy of a legislative proposal released in January and written by big agricultural and grocery business interests. The Grocery Manufacturers Association was instrumental in defeating Washington State’s GMO labeling initiative last year after flooding the contest with money from its corporate sponsors.

The Environmental Working Group has the story here and an interesting opinion piece that dubs Pompeo’s bill the “Deny Americans the Right To Know” or “DARK” act (a name that seems to have caught on) here. Surveys consistently show that some 95% of American support labeling of foods containing genetically engineered or modified (GMO) ingredients. (more…)

Grow Organic Potatoes

PotatoesKeep pesticides off your dinner table by raising your own chemical-free, heirloom potatoes.

Potatoes have always been a family favorite and for good reason. We associate them with Sunday dinners, Monday hash, and home-made Saturday night fries. We love baked potatoes topped with homemade salsa and home-fries with salsa and eggs. We use diced potatoes with cheese and green chile as an enchilada stuffing. In the fall, we make a delicious cheese and mushroom tart with a potato crust. We’ve even been known to make a potato and onion pizza with rosemary. And yes, like everybody else, we love garlic mashed potatoes. (more…)

What’s In Your Food? GMOs, Chemicals, And Our Right To Know

FDA LabelingNew FDA labeling rules include added sugars. And why the bread on that sandwich might taste like a yoga mat.

The big food news this week is the Food and Drug Administration’s announcement that it will update its Nutrition Facts Label requirements “to reflect the latest scientific information, including the link between diet and chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease.” Part of this change deals with portion size. These have been changed in some cases — like increasing the single portion of soda from 12 to 20 ounces — to reflect sizes that are more commonly consumed. We’ll agree that’s a good thing if indeed the change makes figuring what you’re getting from what you consume without having to do any extra math. (more…)

Onion Tool, GMO Labels, & Bats!

Onion SeedlingsUsing a dibble, deception from a GMO front group and $50 billion worth of pest control done by flying mammals.

More on planting onions: A cranky computer kept us from getting in everything we wanted in our previous post on long-day, short-day onions. Starting onions from seed indoors is easy enough. What’s difficult is setting the delicate transplants or sets in the ground (transplants usually just have roots, sets have developed a small onion bulb). Burying sets too deeply means slow growth and small onions. Putting transplants in the ground requires getting the root to hang vertically and not twisted or laying on itself. How to get it right?

Use a dibble. The dibble, or onion tool as it’s sometimes called makes a straight hole as deep as the dibber allows. This allows you to hang the delicate root of the transplant vertically inside the dibble hole. To make sure the root stays straight, lower it to a depth that’s deeper than you want it set, then carefully lift it up as you fill the dibble hole with soil. Onions, depending on their size, should be spaced a good five inches from one another. The dibble is also useful when planting garlic. (more…)

Kids and Cabbage, Exploding Cows & Global Warming

Farmed and DangerousNews items on student gardening programs, marketing food by resisting factory farms, and the complications of climate change.

Learning about gardening one cabbage at a time:  Let’s start with some good news. Bonnie Plants, one of the nation’s largest suppliers of plant starts, has announced the winners of its 3rd Grade Cabbage Program. A winner, randomly chosen from each state, will receive a $1,000 savings bond to be applied to the student’s future education.

While only one winner gets the savings bond, there are no losers in this program. Bonnie supplies millions of cabbage starts around the country to classrooms that choose to participate. Included with the starts are lesson plans that help teachers teach the fundamentals of plant growth. That the students learn their lessons well can be seen in the pictures of the cabbages they’ve grown. (more…)

GMO Wheat and Drought

Genetically Modified WheatAdvocates for genetically modified wheat make questionable claims.

The most recent skirmish in the battle for and against genetically modified crops is being fought over GMO wheat. And the weapon the GMO supporters are using is drought. In a recent New York Times opinion piece entitled “We Need GMO Wheat”, GMO advocates Jayson Lusk and Henry I. Miller make seemingly reasoned arguments worthy of any high school debating team in favor of developing drought-tolerant wheat. Look closely at the arguments and they start to come apart.

The article generated over 400 responses before comments were closed. As always, they’re worth reading — no, we’re not suggesting that you read all 438 of them — because they demonstrate the strong feelings coming from both sides of the issue. But they also underscored some of the fallacies that Lusk and Miller proffer. (more…)

New Threat From Genetic Modification

RNA InterferenceRNAi genetic modification may be more dangerous than existing GMO crops.

Is there another, potentially harmful genetic modification in the works about to be slipped past the public and scientists concerned about human and environmental health?

That possibility was announced this week in the pages of The New York Times ahead of a meeting held Tuesday by the Environmental Protection Agency on the potential risks of the new technology. While the Times article promoted the benefits of the new technology known as RNA interference, it also noted that several experts had serious questions about its use in the world outside the laboratory. (more…)

Cheerios and GMOs

CheeriosGeneral Mills will market GMO-free Cheerios. Big deal?

The battle to label foods containing GMOs has seen some obvious setbacks in the last year. When the ballot initiative in Washington State went down this fall, many pundits could only see the defeat. What the results also reveal is a groundswell of support for labeling GMOs, evidenced by the narrow margins of defeat after the GMO industry (food manufactures, corporate agriculture, and genetically modified seed producers) outspent pro-labeling forces by millions and millions of dollars.

Food producers might be beginning to realize the marketing potential of declaring their products GMO free. General Mills has announced that they will make their best selling cereal Cheerios without GMOs. (more…)

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